2.3L really needs to be tuned better

ric42pars

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First, I will say that I love the 2.3L engine. It's a great Mazda design that has been tried and true for over 15 years. I have had multiple cars with a similar engine. Mazdaspeed 6 (2.3L turbo), Fusion (2.0L turbo, same engine architecture), and my current 2006 Miata has a turbocharged 2.5L. I tuned my Mazdaspeed and Miata on my own and I know this engine responds very well to timing and fuel adjustments. Anyone who has owned a Ford vehicle in the past decade has probably had some form of the Mazda L series engine in their cars. I find it really hard to believe that this engine needs to be in boost while cruising at 70mph. But on the Bronco, it's hovering above atmospheric pressure almost the whole time. I know the vehicle isn't aerodynamic, but I know how much power these engines have around atmospheric. Either way, no gasoline engine should have to be in boost while cruising at regular highway speeds. That would be like if you removed the turbo from the engine, you would have to floor it just to be able to keep speed at 70mph. No way! It doesn't take 170 horsepower to hold a steady speed in a 4500lb vehicle.
The timing must be retarded by quite a bit, and the air fuel ratio must be hovering around stoichiometric. Both are robbing power, but trying to be fuel efficient. I would really like to see Cobb come up with a really good daily driving tune, and not just one that adjusts throttle response. I want them to use their knowledge from the many years of tuning this engine. Adjust the VVT values, adjust timing, more fuel during partial throttle boost. They could keep the WOT the same, I don't care much about that, because i'm not trying to take the Bronco to the drag strip. I want some real life daily driving power gains and get this engine to stop boosting while cruising. This can be done while still maintaining decent gas mileage. I'm currently getting 21.4mpg on my first tank of gas, which is pretty decent. For reference I have a '21 Big Bend 2.3L 7 speed.
Dang. I wish I could get 21 MPG. My Black Diamond gets 18.2-18.4 MPG no matter if I drive on the highway or the back roads. I love the ride and it's a joy to drive, but a gas saver it is not. It's a 2.3l manual. Sport mode has more power than I'll ever need. It's hard to drive it easy it that mode. Fun, fun, fun.
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spada

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One problem. This engine SHARES nothing with Mazda 2.3 other than the same displacement. “Ecoboost” motors were designed by FEV engineering and then licensed to ford……..
The head has obviously been changed a lot from the original design that didn't even have VVT. I've taken these engines apart and have swapped 2019 Fusion engines into 2006 Miatas. The basic block design is the same. Probably still uses friction to hold all the timing components in time. The 2.3L ecoboost head would still bolt onto pretty much any Mazda 2.3L block. It is just a really modern Mazda L series. So yes, it does share the same architecture. The current Mazda Skyavtiv engines are totally different though. Ford continued to use the same old tried and true from the early 2000s.
 

Bronco cat

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The head has obviously been changed a lot from the original design that didn't even have VVT. I've taken these engines apart and have swapped 2019 Fusion engines into 2006 Miatas. The basic block design is the same. Probably still uses friction to hold all the timing components in time. The 2.3L ecoboost head would still bolt onto pretty much any Mazda 2.3L block. It is just a really modern Mazda L series. So yes, it does share the same architecture. The current Mazda Skyavtiv engines are totally different though. Ford continued to use the same old tried and true from the early 2000s.
Dude this engine was a clean sheet design in 2015. You can swap Subaru parts with Porsche parts but those engines were never co-developed. Having interchangeable parts does not mean it was co-developed.
 
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spada

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Dude this engine was a clean sheet design in 2015. You can swap Subaru parts with Porsche parts but those engines were never co-developed. Having interchangeable parts does not mean it was co-developed.
Take the timing cover off and take a photo. I guarantee I can show you a very similar photo.....but from my Mazda. I don't have to try to convince you because you're not listening, and I already know the truth.
 
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spada

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oh i agree, though I wanna find a setup that has minimal highway drone as possible, otherwise just dp/fmic/cai/tune
Yes. But Id stay away from cai. Just get a non oiled high flow drop in air filter
 

Rick Astley

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For all the fact-slingers in here, nobody has even referenced the Pinto, where the 2.3 motor originated.

This is some shameffull S-talking from the millennials and I expected better from all of you.

@MaverickMan and I are so very disappointed in you all.

but I get it, all learning was created when Wikipedia was invented and not a minute before. Bet you kids don't even keep a few pieces of Hubba Bubba bubblegum and a jar of table pepper in your toolboxes.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Pinto_engine
 

MaverickMan

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For all the fact-slingers in here, nobody has even referenced the Pinto, where the 2.3 motor originated.

This is some shameffull S-talking from the millennials and I expected better from all of you.

@MaverickMan and I are so very disappointed in you all.

but I get it, all learning was created when Wikipedia was invented and not a minute before. Bet you kids don't even keep a few pieces of Hubba Bubba bubblegum and a jar of table pepper in your toolboxes.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Pinto_engine
2.0 and 2.3 Limas! Even NA they made good power for their size when built. Turbo they could pretty much keep toe to toe with the current high power ecoboost builds.
 

WuNgUn

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First, I will say that I love the 2.3L engine. It's a great Mazda design that has been tried and true for over 15 years. I have had multiple cars with a similar engine. Mazdaspeed 6 (2.3L turbo), Fusion (2.0L turbo, same engine architecture), and my current 2006 Miata has a turbocharged 2.5L. I tuned my Mazdaspeed and Miata on my own and I know this engine responds very well to timing and fuel adjustments. Anyone who has owned a Ford vehicle in the past decade has probably had some form of the Mazda L series engine in their cars. I find it really hard to believe that this engine needs to be in boost while cruising at 70mph. But on the Bronco, it's hovering above atmospheric pressure almost the whole time. I know the vehicle isn't aerodynamic, but I know how much power these engines have around atmospheric. Either way, no gasoline engine should have to be in boost while cruising at regular highway speeds. That would be like if you removed the turbo from the engine, you would have to floor it just to be able to keep speed at 70mph. No way! It doesn't take 170 horsepower to hold a steady speed in a 4500lb vehicle.
The timing must be retarded by quite a bit, and the air fuel ratio must be hovering around stoichiometric. Both are robbing power, but trying to be fuel efficient. I would really like to see Cobb come up with a really good daily driving tune, and not just one that adjusts throttle response. I want them to use their knowledge from the many years of tuning this engine. Adjust the VVT values, adjust timing, more fuel during partial throttle boost. They could keep the WOT the same, I don't care much about that, because i'm not trying to take the Bronco to the drag strip. I want some real life daily driving power gains and get this engine to stop boosting while cruising. This can be done while still maintaining decent gas mileage. I'm currently getting 21.4mpg on my first tank of gas, which is pretty decent. For reference I have a '21 Big Bend 2.3L 7 speed.
You lost me at "That would be like if you removed the turbo from the engine, you would have to floor it just to be able to keep speed at 70mph" 🤷🏻
 
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spada

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You lost me at "That would be like if you removed the turbo from the engine, you would have to floor it just to be able to keep speed at 70mph" 🤷🏻
There are videos on YouTube that you can watch that will explain manifold pressure, mass air flow, and calculated load and how they relate to each other in regards to engine tuning. Happy learning! I'd like for you to be able to join the discussion next time instead of being lost.
 

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but I get it, all learning was created when Wikipedia was invented and not a minute before. Bet you kids don't even keep a few pieces of Hubba Bubba bubblegum and a jar of table pepper in your toolboxes.
I chuckled when I read this...then I had to immediately Google "pepper and engine repair".
 

WuNgUn

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There are videos on YouTube that you can watch that will explain manifold pressure, mass air flow, and calculated load and how they relate to each other in regards to engine tuning. Happy learning! I'd like for you to be able to join the discussion next time instead of being lost.
Just because you show a slight positive manifold pressure doesn't mean your turbo is spinning 120K rpm or something..
It takes the same HP to do 70mph with the turbo as without, obviously...
It's only the throttle opening because of the high vehicle drag that is causing the turbo to build pressure. It's DOESN'T need the turbo to do 70MPH!
Maybe if you understood how turbos work, you know why that is 🤷🏻
 
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spada

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Just because you show a slight positive manifold pressure doesn't mean your turbo is spinning 120K rpm or something..
It takes the same HP to do 70mph with the turbo as without, obviously...
It's only the throttle opening because of the high vehicle drag that is causing the turbo to build pressure. It's DOESN'T need the turbo to do 70MPH!
Maybe if you understood how turbos work, you know why that is 🤷🏻
If the manifold pressure is 5 psi and you're only keeping a steady 70mph speed and not accelerating, then yes, at that point you do need the turbo. At 0psi, you'd be slowing down.
 

dingle87

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I guess I do not understand and/or agree. I have been driving a loaner 4 cyl. BB for the last 4 weeks, did 2000 miles, including engine break-in. I live at 6000 feet and took it to 11000 on excursions. Now, this is with AT, but I can confirm this puppy rides really good, plenty of power, acceleration is awesome, spools up plenty fast, and if you put it in Sport-mode, you better hold on to your grab handles!
I think the tuning is really good, so good, that I have doubted my selection of the 2.7 on my own BD.......
I've been wondering... I drove a 2.7L Wildtrak the other day and it was very quick (in normal and sport modes). I asked to drive a 2.3L Ranger, but they didn't have one on the lot. He said he'd contact me when they got one in. I'm very curious to drive the 2.3L to see how similar/different it is from the 2.7L. I have time to wait. LOL
 

Rick Astley

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I chuckled when I read this...then I had to immediately Google "pepper and engine repair".
Peppering a radiator is an old hotrodders trick. And it certainly works in some applications.

Can't imagine the horrors you would unleash on a modern car with its microscopic water passages and openings

Unfortunately all of my classic car radiator failures have been catastrophic instead of pinhole leaks.

Hubba Bubba though, bubblegum has absolutely gotten me to the next town in the wee hours of the morning for parts while on cross-country drives.

Back on topic: this is a pretty sad and misguided thread, but at least there's some tribal knowledge being handed down through the anals of time.
 
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