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2.3L vs 2.7L (5 Star Tuning Dyno Comparisons)

edgeflyer

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Ok, I have a good bit of experience with Ford engines and know the capabilities of the Ecoboost's as well as many others. That being said, I still don't necessarily want a 4 in my rig. But, I don't underestimate that it has more HP and torque than most 90's V8's. I'm still a powerhead and like torque/HP. I am almost ok with the 10AT and 2.7 now, but I still really want a stick. I finally dug into the dyno's for the 2 power plants to look at the torque curves. With all the conversations regarding "is the 4 going to be enough", I figured I'd go ahead and grab some screenshots and post for anyone who wants to see them.

All charts are from 5 star and should be taken with a grain of salt due to fuel discrepancies, atmospheric conditions, different days, yada yada yada.

No need to get into dyno discrepancies conversation. For me, its the best tool I have to answer my question. My concern is on-road acceleration with big tires as either choice will be sufficient off-road. I will drive this when I'm not on my motorcycle and don't want too much of a turd around town. For this, I am looking at the torque delta at 1200-3000 RPM, where you are getting things moving off the line. My conclusion is that with the low final gearing and torque numbers, both engines will be fine and not struggle. It is apparent though that the 2.7 has a considerable low torque advantage for 2 high driving, although the tune seems to improve things quite a bit.

First chart - 2019 Ranger 2.3 Stock (Ignore the E50 tune)
Second chart - 2019 Ranger with 87 tune
Third chart - 2018 F150 2.7 Stock

For reference, a 1996 Bronco 5.0 specs at 198 HP / 270 lb.ft. TQ from the factory.



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Badplaid72

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I'm not sure if I am missing something but I don't see any replies to this post. I would like to say thank you. I think we must be the only ones that like to see the numbers. I have been looking for this kind of comparison for a while. I like to see the curves and how they relate across the power band. You can tell me an engine has over 400 HP, but dang, if I need to redline my engine out of a situation, I probably screwed up and I'm in over my head! I drive, like you, 1500 to 3500 RPM, what does that look like?! You gave me clearer vision. I still don't know what to get but hey, at least I have real data and not opinions.

Thanks for the great post!
 

ATLBronco75

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Awesome. I’m getting a 2.7 with a 93 octane tune. I’m sure it will crank out the power.

Have any graphs of something like that?
 

EvlNvrDys

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I'm gonna keep my question simple because I have no clue about tunes (you know me, I'm the I WANT a v8 dammit!! guy).

So if I take the stock 2.7 and run 93 octane (which I run anyways) I'll get the standard 310 hp, 400 lbf of torque.

So is there a simple software tune (being as I don't want to replace intakes, coolers, and whatever), that'll bump those numbers for me? And if so, by gaining, what do I lose in return?
 

L8apex

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I'm gonna keep my question simple because I have no clue about tunes (you know me, I'm the I WANT a v8 dammit!! guy).

So if I take the stock 2.7 and run 93 octane (which I run anyways) I'll get the standard 310 hp, 400 lbf of torque.

So is there a simple software tune (being as I don't want to replace intakes, coolers, and whatever), that'll bump those numbers for me? And if so, by gaining, what do I lose in return?
There will be simple software tunes that get you more power - what you'll most likely lose out on is the ability to put any fuel other than 93 in the vehicle, and some MPGs.
 
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edgeflyer

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Awesome. I’m getting a 2.7 with a 93 octane tune. I’m sure it will crank out the power.

Have any graphs of something like that?
Keep in mind that the Ranger (2.3T) is going to be geared higher, but does weigh probably 1,000 pounds less using the same 2.3T w/10 speed. I still feel like the gearing advantage we get outweighs the weight penalty which is helpful to us in slow to medium wheeling speeds in the 4cyl.

Basically, slow off road and mud, its almost a wash when using the 7MT with the 4cyl. Sand and high speed would favor the 2.7 Really comes down to "do you like rowing or not"? If you like driving "fast" on the street, the 4cyl will not disappoint, but also won't impress. Main reason being the momentum loss during manual shifts vs the 10 speed almost never coasting.

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LemonShark

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I'm gonna keep my question simple because I have no clue about tunes (you know me, I'm the I WANT a v8 dammit!! guy).

So if I take the stock 2.7 and run 93 octane (which I run anyways) I'll get the standard 310 hp, 400 lbf of torque.

So is there a simple software tune (being as I don't want to replace intakes, coolers, and whatever), that'll bump those numbers for me? And if so, by gaining, what do I lose in return?
Lose factory Warranty, unless it's from Ford, or a piggy-back tuner you can remove. Perhaps some longevity on certain parts. A tune on a manual car will effect the clutch.

I've had tuned cars for 20 years. It's magic. It really is.
 

EvlNvrDys

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Perhaps some longevity on certain parts.
You turned me off right there. I'm that guy who typically takes my vehicles past 200k miles. About to pass 200k on my Mustang with the V6, most I've done to it is a brake caliper and water pump (plus the axle back exhaust). I like it when I don't have to replace half an engine. So if the tune will hurt the vehicle in the long run, I'll stick with 310 hp and 400 lbs. torque.\

But thank you to those who answered.
 
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edgeflyer

edgeflyer

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You turned me off right there. I'm that guy who typically takes my vehicles past 200k miles. About to pass 200k on my Mustang with the V6, most I've done to it is a brake caliper and water pump (plus the axle back exhaust). I like it when I don't have to replace half an engine. So if the tune will hurt the vehicle in the long run, I'll stick with 310 hp and 400 lbs. torque.\

But thank you to those who answered.
Notice he said perhaps lose some longevity. There are many tuners that write tunes that will do no harm to any components. Find the reputable ones and you will be OK. PM me and I can send recommendations. As far as clutch wear, that's up to the driver. Clutch wear is all about the amount of slip time and RPM during engagement. On an automatic, a tune can even extend the life of the transmission clutches or drums (again, use a reputable tuner). Also, talk with your dealers service department. A lot of them will give you their blessing. All my vehicles are tuned and I tune race motorcycles myself and have never had issues when respecting the vehicle. If you look at the dynos of a naturally aspirated V8 vs the 2.7, I think you will be surprised by the torque figures where you actually drive.
 
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Personally going with JB4 for my 2.7L. Solid tuner with decades of experience and very clear powerband.
 

PHX396

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What I don’t get some people aren’t factoring in being as both vehicles are turbos is that the one large benefit of an automatic is turbos will always stay spooled and you won’t lose boost when you shift as you will with the manual.
 
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edgeflyer

edgeflyer

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Yep, says it in my post above. I agree 100%
 

DrewBronc21

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great info! coming from modified Subaru’s for the last 13 years and a huge fan of E85 tunes, I cant wait to get a Bronco. The aftermarket will be huge. I use Cobb tuning on my STis and they have tuning for 2.3 Ecoboost in mustang and focus already. I really want the manual but the 2.7 has more potential . Still, a tuned 2.3 with a manual making about 350 whp and 400 wtq like that Ethanol tuned Ranger in first post would be REALLY fun. That’s about what my current STI makes and it’s a blast. The Bronco will be at least 1000lbs more than my STi but it will still be quick. I’ve seen some tuned Rangers doing quarter mile in mid 13s And under 6 secs 0-60. Not bad for a 4cyl truck.
 

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