2.5" Lift - not so expensive afterall

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AcesandEights

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The OP thought the Ranger chassis was like the Bronco chassis, it is not, and I explained that in pictures.

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The OP didn't think the Ranger chassis was like the Bronco, except where they are similar. The OP is very familiar with IFS, SFA, IRS, coils, coilovers and leafs, etc.

I was more excited to see OME at the table and showing it off. I've read a number of posts about spending $3k for a lift. OME, at least in my opinion is a premier brand, and it isn't $3k.





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One thing to remember is the Ranger has rear leaf springs. This is VERY easy and cheap to lift, blocks or drop shackles, or both. The Bronc on the other hand has 4 coil overs. Yeah spacers are cheap, but not good at improving the vehicles capability. JMO
I know the difference, and so does OME.
 
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Yes the lift is 1400 but when you buy tires and wheels now you are at about 3500 or more and I am guessing you 1400 lift is not as good as the Sas and you get lockers with fords for 5000
OME not as good as stock? Maybe in an alternate universe. I think you missed the point of my post and arent familiar with high quality suspension components.

My post was about those that want a high quality product and a small lift, that already had a base model (not Sasquatch) set up. Even the higher priced shocks are often paired with OME coils. There aren't (m)any better.
 

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OME not as good as stock? Maybe in an alternate universe. I think you missed the point of my post and arent familiar with high quality suspension components.

My post was about those that want a high quality product and a small lift, that already had a base model (not Sasquatch) set up. Even the higher priced shocks are often paired with OME coils. There aren't (m)any better.
I don't know what shocks you getting with you 1400 lift get but the Sasquatch comes with Bilstein ESCV shocks and I bet they not cheap but my point is if you going add lift and tires and wheels to a base you better off paying the 5000 for the Sasquatch package sense you get a warranty and well add more real sale then a after market
 
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You get OME shocks with the OME kit. OME builds suspension "systems" and their shocks and springs are paired to work together.

Why keep bringing up the price of wheels and tires? Not what this thread is about. Although, if you buy wheels and tires, they cost the same no matter what shocks you have.

I guess by your logic there is no market for aftermarket suspension since, Sasquatch.
 

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SFA instead of IFS I know, but I did the OME 2.5” JKU lift on my Jeep. It was pretty straight forward. My point in commenting though is the ride on the light / mid lift is great, and when I had a problem with the rear springs (that ARB recommended to me) being too light, ARB sent me heavy springs no charge.

All this to say I would definitely recommend ARB OME for value, installation ease, and customer service.
 

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SFA instead of IFS I know, but I did the OME 2.5” JKU lift on my Jeep. It was pretty straight forward. My point in commenting though is the ride on the light / mid lift is great, and when I had a problem with the rear springs (that ARB recommended to me) being too light, ARB sent me heavy springs no charge.

All this to say I would definitely recommend ARB OME for value, installation ease, and customer service.
Second this. I have the medium duty OME kit on my FJ, which of course is IFS. Six years later, it is still riding great both on paved roads and off. Never had a problem with any of it. Added about 2.5" of lift even though the specs say 3". It was also warrantied for 3 years/37K miles. Prices vary by vehicle, but I paid around $1000.
 

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I know the difference, and so does OME.

I guess my point was more that I don't see a "mid lift" for a Bronco being as cheap as one for a Ranger, depending on how a manufacturer "lifts" the Bronco. I am thinking the Bronco kit would be more in the 2K to 2500 because of the setup not being a simple. That said I could be wrong as well. We will see.

You seem like one who knows a little bit so I won't go into the specifics and I will take for granted you have heard of BDS, similar to OME, high quality lifts, Their 3.5 Ranger kit is only 1200 but uses upper arms and spacers in front and shackles rear, to maintain geometry.

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............... Then for another 1200 (2400 overall) you can ditch the spacers and go whole new coil over. Basically the same kit but with a COMPLETE new coil over. NOT just a shock and spring to "rebuild" your stock coil over. Nothing wrong with that, Bilstein ( another quality manufacturer), like OME, has made this type of "leveling" kits for a while now. The complete coil over is a step up IMO.

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That said, when we go to a Bronco, I can see companies doing the same. Spacers and upper arms in the front, spacers and maybe track bar rear, and maybe in the 1200-1500 range. Or ditch the spacers and go coil overs. BIG difference being, the Ranger still has shocks in the back. The Bronco DOES NOT and needs 2 more coil overs. So therefore I believe the Bronco kits will be a bit more because of the setup. 1200 for 2 coil overs, so another 1200 for 2 more ??

Now the "rebuild" plan could come in a bit less. But it would be "less" of a kit IMO. Hope this clarifies my point a better.
 

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Working on a new Super Duty. Kit says, 40's no lift !!!

Some pics of the rear. Then some of the front, .....still working on it. :D Just had to post when I saw your post. (y)(y)

I can't wait this Bronco "thing" is gonna' be some fun. :ROFLMAO:

Note: this truck also has a BDS radius arm coil over lift as well.

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Love it all except the blocks. Been there done that and they’re not for me. Love the trim though. More people should.
 
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Bilstein 5100 are $99/each for a lot of vehicles, a little less, a little more, especially if you buy all four. $400 for new shocks/struts and they provide a leveled look (they lift the front 0 - 2"). For the Bronco, you're likely only going to need an adjustable strut to get the look many people want, and although it'll change the ride slightly, it probably will allow a 33" tire on any of the Bronco trims.

I hope this doesn't sound rude, because maybe you already (all) know this, but the cool marketing term, coilover doesn't mean anything other than damper (strut/shock) with spring, it's a "coil (spring) over strut/shock", shortened to coilover. It just means you're replacing the spring and damper at the same time, as a unit, a strut assembly. We've all decided that we'll pay extra for a "coilover" because it sounds like a Baja 1000 term, instead of a strut assembly they sell at the Sears tire department.

Many of the big-name companies don't manufacture parts, they put them together. That's why you see companies like BDS using FOX shocks/struts. Those "suspension" companies aren't a manufacturer, they piece OME springs with Bilstein shocks and send you a complete strut assembly (which many people now call a coilover). They all tout they have the best ride in the industry, in fact, many of the companies are sending you the same assembly, although it may have been assembled in their shop.

So, you can get a "kit" from a big-name company, or you can buy the parts separately and save big, getting the same product for much less. What you'll find, at least some of the time, are OME springs mated to another manufacturer's damper. Don't get me wrong, the companies selling the complete assemblies are figuring out what parts go together, then sometimes assembling them, and giving you an easy to install package, but they are making a BIG profit on people thinking they are getting a "name that company" specially tuned to their vehicle, "system". Usually, you're not. You're paying $1k+ to have someone look through the manufacturer application guide, which usually is just used to determine the compressed and extended shock lengths, and re-sell you someone else's parts (like FOX shocks).

By the way, I think trimming the fenders to fit 40" tires is pretty bad ass. I was going to do the same to my truck back in day, with some a/m fenders but decided to go a different route. It's a great way to get amazing ground clearance without having to modify the suspension (although I would have added 2" OME coils and rear leafs on mine).
 

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Bilstein 5100 are $99/each for a lot of vehicles, a little less, a little more, especially if you buy all four. $400 for new shocks/struts and they provide a leveled look (they lift the front 0 - 2"). For the Bronco, you're likely only going to need an adjustable strut to get the look many people want, and although it'll change the ride slightly, it probably will allow a 33" tire on any of the Bronco trims.

I hope this doesn't sound rude, because maybe you already (all) know this, but the cool marketing term, coilover doesn't mean anything other than damper (strut/shock) with spring, it's a "coil (spring) over strut/shock", shortened to coilover. It just means you're replacing the spring and damper at the same time, as a unit, a strut assembly. We've all decided that we'll pay extra for a "coilover" because it sounds like a Baja 1000 term, instead of a strut assembly they sell at the Sears tire department.

Many of the big-name companies don't manufacture parts, they put them together. That's why you see companies like BDS using FOX shocks/struts. Those "suspension" companies aren't a manufacturer, they piece OME springs with Bilstein shocks and send you a complete strut assembly (which many people now call a coilover). They all tout they have the best ride in the industry, in fact, many of the companies are sending you the same assembly, although it may have been assembled in their shop.

So, you can get a "kit" from a big-name company, or you can buy the parts separately and save big, getting the same product for much less. What you'll find, at least some of the time, are OME springs mated to another manufacturer's damper. Don't get me wrong, the companies selling the complete assemblies are figuring out what parts go together, then sometimes assembling them, and giving you an easy to install package, but they are making a BIG profit on people thinking they are getting a "name that company" specially tuned to their vehicle, "system". Usually, you're not. You're paying $1k+ to have someone look through the manufacturer application guide, which usually is just used to determine the compressed and extended shock lengths, and re-sell you someone else's parts (like FOX shocks).

By the way, I think trimming the fenders to fit 40" tires is pretty bad ass. I was going to do the same to my truck back in day, with some a/m fenders but decided to go a different route. It's a great way to get amazing ground clearance without having to modify the suspension (although I would have added 2" OME coils and rear leafs on mine).

No worries, I often think that I come across rude as well, hard to show emotion in a post. Anyway ......................... I had this thread a year ago, but it seems to be among the missing at the moment, coil over vs strut. And so to go over it again, I won't, but the problem a lot of time is terminology, but I will say this ...................

There is a difference between the top "coilover" and the bottom "coilover", BOTH in price AND performance !!!! ................. BUT still BOTH are coilovers !!!!!!

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Just like both of these are control arms. But they differ BOTH in price AND performance !!!!!!

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To your last point we only do what the customer wants, we make suggestions, but it is up to them, what they want to do, for whatever reason. I agree leafs are WAY better than blocks. Been doing this stuff for a looooooong time.
 
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Even cheaper is a spacer lift. In the Raptor world the low cost method that doesn't hurt the suspension is a spring swap. Front springs run about $300.
 

JT58Bronc

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I am very surprised that no one has mentioned gearing- and the cost to change front and rear gears is substantial, if you want to retain the same performance when you go to bigger tires. I too looked at this as an option- to get a lift kit with the base model. You get the 4.7 gears with Sasquatch and can also get lower gearing, similar with the manual transmission. Although if you get the base or anything with automatic you get higher gears. And what about the wait for a lift kit- will manufacturers have them available when we get our Broncos? And they might be very expensive out of the gate- more expensive that a Rangers as they will be a hot commodity.
 
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@JTBronco there are multiple thoughts on this. Some people want to retain the stock springs, thinking they can maintain the stock ride. The Bilstein 5100 are made to use with the stock spring, but are height adjustable. So, if you want to even out your "rake" for example, you can buy front/rear Bilsteins for $400 and give your rig a leveled look, or lift the front and rear by up to 2" or 2.5" while using the stock springs. Those Bilsteins will be "off the shelf" OEM replacements, so they are almost assuredly available now, sitting on the shelf and some people have already figured out which ones have the correct extended and compressed lengths for use with the Bronco, they just haven't updated their application guides yet.

If you want to use aftermarket springs, which sometimes are better than OEM, but very often they are not, you would have to figure out what size springs you need and look through some catalogs. What will happen is a/m suspension companies will determine the diameter of the coil, the number of coils, the spring rate, etc. of the stock coil and figure out what off the shelf spring is an OE replacement. They will then pair it with a new strut and boom, you have a new "coilover" assembly with new spring. The springs won't be "made" for a Bronco, it'll be a spring that works with that application (typically, or almost assuredly). You will get essentially the same thing as using a Bilstein 5100 with stock spring, unless you're willing to pay $1k per corner for a more tuned assembly. Even those aren't really "tuned" to your vehicle, but a best guess/compromise based on a few questions about weight and use.

Another thing to mention , is struts/shocks typically have a 50k mile life. So, if you pay $1k a corner, realize those are probably rebuildable, and you'll want to have them rebuilt if you use the rig off road. The other thing is that almost none of us will "need" the $1k/corner coilover, nor will we use all of its potential and it will be $1k/corner thing that needs a $300/corner rebuild every 4 - 6 years.

I'm a huge proponent of aftermarket suspension. All of my vehicles (cars, trucks, motorcycles), except my commuter car have aftermarket suspension. I spend a lot of time figuring out what works, throwing parts in the dumpster, and trying something else. What I've come to find out though, is that most of us don't overwork the stock components, so it's really a matter of "wanting" something, not "needing" something. The only thing I've ever really felt "needed" the upgrades was my motorcycle, but it was built to compete in off road events; otherwise, it's been about "want". And, the motorcycle(s) get a lot of attention, maintenance and rebuilt suspension components.

T'were me, and it will be, I'd use the stock components until they started to squeak and moan. Then I'd buy moderately priced a/m components and pay to replace them every five years or when they started to squeak and moan again.
 

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Eh, diff drops aren’t always all that. Usually used in place of fender trimming, which would be better in the long run.
Diff drops are used on IFS rigs to lessen the CV operating angles after a lift. Has nothing to do with fender trimming.

Fender trimming is definitely my preferred way to get bigger tires without big lifts.

Hopefully with the removable fenders on the Bronco, we'll see a few companies tackle replacement fenders for big clearance.
 

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