Advanced 4x4 vs the standard option

chownd

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I tried searching but couldn't find explanation of the difference between the two. Anyone have info or a thread to point me two?





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MacHudson

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Advanced is supposedly safe to drive on dry pavement and will function like an AWD system. Kicks in the 4WD only when you need it and then reverts back to 2H.

it will apparently use computer controlled braking on the wheels that are slipping in order to direct power to the wheel that has grip, in the absence of a fully engaged locking differential

standard 4x4 must never be driven on dry pavement. That’s how you cause drive train damage as parts get mashed together due to lack of slipping as you make a turn.

but apparently you can use 4H on snowy pavement? I’m really confused as to whether you have to turn it off as you approach blacktop. Maybe you cannot use 4H on mixed surfaces in the city? I’m confused as to that

the standard 4x4 selector gives you 2H, 4H and 4L.

the advanced system adds another choice: 4A.

EDIT: take my words with a grain of salt. Read the manual. I’m a noob here.
 
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ZackDanger

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There’s definitely some long threads talking about the distinctions, but basically 4A is a setting in which the vehicle is normally in 2H but can quickly engage and disengage 4H if it detects slip.

Additionally, the transfer case utilizes clutch packs which allow for “slippage” meaning it’s safe to engage the 4H in this mode on an otherwise high traction surface without causes drivetrain binding like you would when locking it into 4H.

It is *not* akin to an AWD system like most people think of in a Subaru or Audi, etc.
 
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chownd

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Thanks all. Wicked helpful and the similar threads pulled some of the ones I was missing with search
 

Apples

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There's also a gearing difference. The standard 4x4 is 2.72:1. The Advance 4x4 is 3.06:1. If you want the advertised 94.75:1 crawl ratio, you need to option the Advance 4x4 along with the 7 speed. It gives you a better ratio in the auto too but I don't remember the numbers specifically.
 

85_Ranger4x4

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4H can be used in snow, even if you run into sections of road without snow, you’ll be fine. You just shouldn’t use 4H if most the road is bare. 4A makes it so you NEVER have to worry about that
The big thing is to not turn any more than you have to. The more you turn the more binding you get.

I have only ever had dumb 4wds up to having levers coming out of the floor. Keeping up on when 4wd is needed second nature to me. I actually kind of prefer it, it helps me keep better tabs on road conditions. 4WD only helps you go better, it does nothing to help stopping.
 

robepa

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I think this is one of the most under reported and appreciated features on the Bronco. In the research I have done it gives a lot of the advantages of AWD with the weight/space/cost that AWD systems add. Best as I can tell it is a wet clutch that can transfer up to 50% of the torque to the front axel in stepless increments. For the AWD vehicles I have had I can say they are far superior for on road low traction, for example on snowy roads 4WD systems can force tires to slip where as an AWD system does not and therefore performs much better. It remains to be seen how well this system simulates AWD, but in general I'm excited about it. Now if we could just get driving reviews from someone not on Ford's payroll...
 

85_Ranger4x4

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I think this is one of the most under reported and appreciated features on the Bronco. In the research I have done it gives a lot of the advantages of AWD with the weight/space/cost that AWD systems add. Best as I can tell it is a wet clutch that can transfer up to 50% of the torque to the front axel in stepless increments. For the AWD vehicles I have had I can say they are far superior for on road low traction, for example on snowy roads 4WD systems can force tires to slip where as an AWD system does not and therefore performs much better. It remains to be seen how well this system simulates AWD, but in general I'm excited about it. Now if we could just get driving reviews from someone not on Ford's payroll...
Automatic 4wd has been around a long time, my mom's 2002 Explorer had it. It worked pretty good. It had 4hi, 4lo and automatic, just a boring 4.0 XLT.

It is the only reason we are getting a Black Diamond, it is the cheapest package that has 4x4A.

Knocking on wood I haven't had my regular 4wd give me any problems though... my wife doesn't know how to run it and the Bronco is for her.
 

Southern Girl

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Advanced is supposedly safe to drive on dry pavement and will function like an AWD system. Kicks in the 4WD only when you need it and then reverts back to 2H.

it will apparently use computer controlled braking on the wheels that are slipping in order to direct power to the wheel that has grip, in the absence of a fully engaged locking differential

standard 4x4 must never be driven on dry pavement. That’s how you cause drive train damage as parts get mashed together due to lack of slipping as you make a turn.

but apparently you can use 4H on snowy pavement? I’m really confused as to whether you have to turn it off as you approach blacktop. Maybe you cannot use 4H on mixed surfaces in the city? I’m confused as to that

the standard 4x4 selector gives you 2H, 4H and 4L.

the advanced system adds another choice: 4A.

EDIT: take my words with a grain of salt. Read the manual. I’m a noob here.
You can use 4x4 on pavement. You just aren't supposed to go over a certain mph, especially in 4L.
 

Gr8Hortoni

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There's also a gearing difference. The standard 4x4 is 2.72:1. The Advance 4x4 is 3.06:1. If you want the advertised 94.75:1 crawl ratio, you need to option the Advance 4x4 along with the 7 speed. It gives you a better ratio in the auto too but I don't remember the numbers specifically.
80:1 for the 10A. In comparison, the rubicon has a 4:1 t - case gearing, and is somewhere along the lines of 82:1 (I believe) with the manual transmission, high 60’s or low 70’s with the automatic.

edit: 77:1 for JL auto, 84:1 for manual
 

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