Best Tire Set up for Snow

jsharpe

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No, you don't HAVE to. But the title of the thread is BEST SET UP FOR SNOW, not CAN YOU DRIVE IN SNOW ON ALL SEASONS (you can)? The best set up for snow is with dedicated winter tires. IMO a set of Blizzak's (or another quality snow tire, partial to Blizzak myself) is one of the single best additions one can make to a vehicle for driving in the snow.
+1. I was really happy to find these for the Sasquatch
https://www.nokiantires.com/tires/by-tire-size/winter-tires/?s=315-70-17





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pat86323

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It’s all about using the proper tool for the job. Sure you can accelerate all day with four wheel drive and all seasons, but stopping and turning are a whole different story. The decrease in stopping distances and increased handling that a winter tire provides is one of the biggest differences you will notice in a tire on the road. I’ll never have another vehicle without dedicated winter tires while living in the Midwest.
Would it be nice, sure, is it necessary, absolutely not. Driver skill plays a much bigger role. I survived my first two years in this town (and about 8 storms of 12" plus of snow, in a rear wheel drive 99 ranger with basically car tires, and I lived on a hill. I know damb good and well that I'm not spending 1000$ on snow tires. I'll rely on driving skill, and whatever tires I choose. I've also driven a friend's 4 runner with studded snow tires, and didn't really feel any better about it
 

JH1026

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Would it be nice, sure, is it necessary, absolutely not. Driver skill plays a much bigger role. I survived my first two years in this town (and about 8 storms of 12" plus of snow, in a rear wheel drive 99 ranger with basically car tires, and I lived on a hill. I know damb good and well that I'm not spending 1000$ on snow tires. I'll rely on driving skill, and whatever tires I choose. I've also driven a friend's 4 runner with studded snow tires, and didn't really feel any better about it
Two winters ago I drove a lowered S2000 all winter on General Arctic Altimax’s. Driver skill would not have made that feasible. It was the tires. Winter tires are also relatively cheap($500-$600/set) if you don’t buy Blizzak’s or Nokian tires and buy when tire deals are present. You can also find deals at garages that do bulk buys so you aren’t adding freight to the cost.
 

pat86323

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Two winters ago I drove a lowered S2000 all winter on General Arctic Altimax’s. Driver skill would not have made that feasible. It was the tires. Winter tires are also relatively cheap($500-$600/set) if you don’t buy Blizzak’s or Nokian tires and buy when tire deals are present. You can also find deals at garages that do bulk buys so you aren’t adding freight to the cost.
I'm not saying that a snow tire doesnt have its place, but for the VAST majority of people, in the vast majority of vehicles, in the vast majority of situations. Most tires will do, as long as they arent worn to death, and the driver knows what they are doing. With these Broncos, basically any of the tires that would come from the factory will conquer 95% of snowy conditions in the U.S. Remember, we are talking about a 4x4 vehicle with special settings for snow, not a lowered s2000.
 

JH1026

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I'm not saying that a snow tire doesnt have its place, but for the VAST majority of people, in the vast majority of vehicles, in the vast majority of situations. Most tires will do, as long as they arent worn to death, and the driver knows what they are doing. With these Broncos, basically any of the tires that would come from the factory will conquer 95% of snowy conditions in the U.S. Remember, we are talking about a 4x4 vehicle with special settings for snow, not a lowered s2000.
You can trust the computer, I’ll trust the tires.

 

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Remember, we are talking about a 4x4 vehicle with special settings for snow, not a lowered s2000.
the limiting factor is the tires. physics beats skill when you run out of grip.
 

pat86323

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You all can waste your money any way you see fit. I live in a snowy mountain town. My drive to work is likely more hairy than anything in all of Wisconsin lol. I'll be just fine with whatever gets thrown at me.
 

pat86323

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the limiting factor is the tires. physics beats skill when you run out of grip.
Yep, I agree physics do beat skill. But I dont think that there will be much, especially if you have lockers, that will keep one of these machines down with any of the available tires. I have literally driven on a foot of packed snow, or 4 feet of fluffy snow, on nothing more than a cheap set of all terrains, up and down some pretty steep stuff with no lockers, and it wasn't a big deal.
 

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Yep, I agree physics do beat skill. But I dont think that there will be much, especially if you have lockers, that will keep one of these machines down with any of the available tires. I have literally driven on a foot of packed snow, or 4 feet of fluffy snow, on nothing more than a cheap set of all terrains, up and down some pretty steep stuff with no lockers, and it wasn't a big deal.
it ain't the going, it's the stopping and control. there's simply more available with winter tires during winter conditions.
 

pat86323

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it ain't the going, it's the stopping and control. there's simply more available with winter tires during winter conditions.
Yes, I'm aware it's the stopping lol, again I go up and down steep slippery stuff all the time. And have driven a vehicle with snow tires, and wasn't really that impressed over my all terrains, or the mud claws I used to have on my Toyota. You guys can spend money on whatever you want, but I personally think in all but the most specific situations, it is a waste of money.
 

RMKRubicon

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My family does a lot of skiing in Vermont and I have heard that the wider tires on a Sasquatch will not be ideal for snow/slush. I hope to take my Bronco off-road but only a couple times a year so the focus should be winter weather.
You are 100% correct that the wider tires on the Sasquatch will not be ideal for snow/slush. You can get through snow and slush, but it's not ideal and there are much better options.

If you're driving up I-91 after a snowstorm and the highway has been plowed, but is covered with a packed layer of cold, hard, frozen snow, you don't want any MT tire or anything wide. If the highway is covered with snow and slush an MT tire will get you through it, but I wouldn't go more than 35MPH in those conditions.

You specifically mentioned driving up to Vermont, which implies highway driving (probably), so forget about using your lockers. Lockers are great for mud bogging, rock crawling, winter wheeling, steep hill climbs, slow speed stuff, etc., but shouldn't be used on highways.

For slush and snow, you can also get by with an AT tire that has the "severe snow service" 3-peak mountain snowflake on the side, but there are still better options. I always found that once an MT or AT tire had about 10k miles on them, their winter performance started going downhill fast.

Your best bet: Buy a second set of wheels and mount 'em up with some Bridgestone Blizzaks. You can get them in a 32x10 (255/75/17) or a 34x10.8 (275/65/20) or a 33x10.5 (275x70x18) and other similar sizes. The reason Blizzaks (and most dedicated snow tires) are the best choice is because they're made with a softer rubber compound and have more siping. Softer rubber compounds do a better job of gripping hard pack snow and ice (better than harder rubber compounds) and the sipes provide extra traction as well. The tread pattern itself should help with ejecting the slush and snow and put the tread on the ground to provide grip.

An interesting option that I may try on my F-150 this winter or my new Bronco next winter: Kenda Klever in size 35x10.50x17 with studs. I always prefer skinny tires in the snow and the Kenda Klever is sort of a hybrid AT/MT with the ability to accept studs. I haven't seen it in person to feel the rubber softness/hardness, but because of that tall skinny size, I might just take the plunge and try it.

Summary: Skinny Blizzaks are the best (in my experience). Skinny AT tires with the snowflake symbol will be good. MTs will get you through deep snow at slow speeds but they're a nightmare on the highway in cold weather because of their hard rubber compound, and the Kenda Klever studded pizza cutter might be the most intriguing tire to come out lately.


PS. I grew up in New England but have lived in Colorado for nearly 20 years at 8k feet of elevation. My old job involved driving the highways all winter long in every condition and I had such good experiences with the Blizzaks on a Chevy Tahoe that I put them on my personal truck (F-150) and my wife's car (AWD Toyota Venza) every November.

I could get by with an AT tire but in winter in a blizzard or ice storm with the family I wanted the best advantage that I could get, and my roughly 100K miles of winter-specific real-world driving experience over a decade showed me the Blizzak was the best.
 

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Although I agree that you can get by without snow tires, I'd still recommend them if you can afford them. After one particularly scary drive down the canyon in a storm I realized my tread was minimal. It was an old car with not a ton of miles left so I figured I'd try snow tires, see if the hype was real.

It is real. I will run real snow tires for the rest of my life. But I can afford the extra wheels, have a place to keep them and don't mind switching them out.

20 years ago when money was tight, even knowing what I know now I'd just keep the all seasons and slow down.
 

Xodric

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Tall and skinny is better than any off-road tire in the snow. Living in Winterpeg, Manitoba it gets colder here than the surface of Mars. We get pounded with so much snow it can bury your car. Snow tires are a must.
 

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A set a seperate set of winter/snow tires is your best bet. Nothing can compare to dedicated snow tires. It will be well worth it for the safety aspect and performance.
 

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