Ford 2.7L EcoBoost Engine Overview

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You are right, they are different engines but they are similar as well. Both are high pressure and hot engines that inevitably create oil vapors that seep back, thru to the valve seats.
Both engines have been developed with experience from racing technology and I wonder how they will last as daily drivers.
So i just want more info on 'em from people who know a lot more than I do.
The concern with valve coking (carbon deposits from burned oil) is from vaporised oil in the intake stream coming in from the PCV system, that is why oil separators ("catch cans") are inline on the PCV hose that feeds to the intake. The other end connects to the "low pressure" side of the engine, the valve train, crankcase, etc. There is a lot of action going on in there and it needs to be vented. It can't vent to atmosphere so it is routed back into the engine's intake to be burned in combustion. This hot air does have some oil vapour in it, and this causes coking problems on the valves of direct injected engines.

Oil vapour in the intake has been fine for years with manifold injection, either port or throttle body. In those fuel delivery systems, there is an air/fuel mix always passing over the back sides of the valves, reducing oil vapour deposits. When there is only direct injection, all the fuel goes directly into the cylinder, bypassing the valves, and there is no "washing" effect from the air alone. Direct injection combined with port injection is the best of both worlds, the engine can still run higher compression and boost because of the DI, but you also get the port injection "washing" effect.

The 2.3 Ecoboost only has direct injection, which is why many would recommend an oil catch can. The second generation 2.7 Ecoboost (2018+) has both direct and port injection, so a catch can is not as important.





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buzpro

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The concern with valve coking (carbon deposits from burned oil) is from vaporised oil in the intake stream coming in from the PCV system, that is why oil separators ("catch cans") are inline on the PCV hose that feeds to the intake. The other end connects to the "low pressure" side of the engine, the valve train, crankcase, etc. There is a lot of action going on in there and it needs to be vented. It can't vent to atmosphere so it is routed back into the engine's intake to be burned in combustion. This hot air does have some oil vapour in it, and this causes problem coking problems on the valves of direct injected engines.

Oil vapour in the intake has been fine for years with manifold injection, either port or throttle body. In those fuel delivery systems, there is an air/fuel mix always passing over the back sides of the valves, reducing oil vapour deposits. When there is only direct injection, all the fuel goes directly into the cylinder, bypassing the valves, and there is no "washing" effect from the air alone. Direct injection combined with port injection is the best of both worlds, the engine can still run higher compression and boost because of the DI, but you also get the port injection "washing" effect.

The 2.3 Ecoboost only has direct injection, which is why many would recommend an oil catch can. The second generation 2.7 Ecoboost (2018+) has both direct and port injection, so a catch can is not as important.
Excellent info .... Thank You

I plan to drive this thing to the ground ..... Now when you say a catch can is not as important on the 2.7 Ecoboost, does that mean installing one is unnecessary?
 
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Excellent info .... Thank You

I plan to drive this thing to the ground ..... Now when you say a catch can is not as important on the 2.7 Ecoboost, does that mean installing one is unnecessary?
I won't say that, because someone smarter than me will probably come a long with a few benefits. I would say that there is no downside to installing one, besides having to empty it occasionally.
 

Razorback

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Water cooled exhaust manifolds? What's the reasoning for those?.... I'd figure more heat for the turbos would be beneficial. Unless they do it for durability reasons.
I'm not crazy about the Integrated Front Cover... is the water pump replaceable? Hope I don't have to deal with crazy maint costs 20 years from now.
Anybody know what boost levels these run at? Think I saw 15-ish. Wonder how much they can take.
Not sure of the reasons for the water cooled exhaust manifolds... but cooler air is better for the turbos as it's more dense.
 

VoltageDrop

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I would prefer to see an aluminum oil pan but at least they aren't going with the plastic rear differential cover like they did on the first gen. Explorer :oops:
 

Fly by Nite

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Not sure of the reasons for the water cooled exhaust manifolds... but cooler air is better for the turbos as it's more dense.
mneblett posted a link to an article which stated the water cooled exhaust manifolds gets the engine up to operating temp quicker, increasing efficiency/gas mileage.
It also makes the engine more compact and lighter.....it doesn't need heavy cast iron exhaust manifolds. A downside is we can't put headers on it to improve breathing and performance.
The writer is confused on his statement:
>>"Also, the exhaust gases exit the turbo at a lower temperature, then they travel through the intercooler and the temperature drops even more. By the time they reach the intake manifold, the air is denser, which means improved efficiency and more power."<<
Um, actually, it's not the exhaust gasses that travel thru the intercooler..... it's the intake charge on the 'other' side of the turbo.
Cool, dense air is beneficial on the intake/compressor side. For the exhaust/turbine side you want hot air.... it's less dense and has a higher volume which is what makes the turbo turbine spin.
I love turbos!.... my first was in a V6 Regal and then my daily driver '88 Saab 900 SPG. The Saab setup was a huge improvement over the '79 Buick.... can't wait to see what another 30 years of advancements will be like in my Bronco.
 

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