Getting ready... What other accessories / preparations?

Natai

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My Cannonball kit also includes a couple of reflector vests, a reflective triangle and some road flares. My nightmare is a roadside wheel and tire change at night, danger of getting hit by oncoming traffic.
Yes, I've got a vest and triangle as well.
Looking for flares was what lead me to finding those LED beacons. They essentially act as a flare, but you can magnetically attach them to the vehicle or hang them from something. They are reportedly very bright and can switch between steady and flashing.

I have had one of these for a few years and it's had about 15 flawless starts up to and including decommissioned military vehicles turned into mobile party platforms in 120+ degree temps and stored in an trailer all year between uses.

https://antigravitybatteries.com/products/micro-starts/xp-10-hd/
I did see that on a couple of lists as well. Thanks for the suggestion!
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MadMan4BamaNATL

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Very little of that will be on board on a regular basis. If I get into camping or overlanding down the road, then load rating is going to hit me hard.

I've done some searches and read some reviews, but there seems to be very little consistency in terms of which jump starters are supposed to be good. Usually I find some commonalities across recommended lists and the like, but not so much with what I've found so far. NOCO was at least consistently mentioned, but that could just be because it's popular.
That's one long list. In many of my previous posts I've mentioned the need to space out many of the purchases, which I think you've been doing.

I have a NOCO, only used once and worked fine for me. These batteries at times don't like to be overcharged, so keep it charged, but maybe try not to overcharge like leave overnight. I know they may say they'll be fine, but I don't even do this with my cell phone.

My only thing; and this is me, I don't cut or try to save money on recovery gear. For example is the kinetic rope you mention. My rope may be pricey (VooDoo) at $150 on sale, but I wouldn't use one that cost less than $100. Working once is one thing, but it generally takes more than one snatch to free a truck. A rope that can survive abuse for up to 4 attempts is highly recommended. Then in 2 days should be ready to roll again if kept relatively clean and always keep it dry as possible. A cheaper rope may fail or not take water well. Just a thought.

I personally don't touch Hi Lift jacks, they're tricky. I use a bottle jack, likely same one you have listed. a couple of flat wood pieces and you're good to go almost anywhere. Anywhere I can't place my bottle jack, I damn sure won't try a Hi Lift.
 

Natai

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That's one long list. In many of my previous posts I've mentioned the need to space out many of the purchases, which I think you've been doing.

I have a NOCO, only used once and worked fine for me. These batteries at times don't like to be overcharged, so keep it charged, but maybe try not to overcharge like leave overnight. I know they may say they'll be fine, but I don't even do this with my cell phone.

My only thing; and this is me, I don't cut or try to save money on recovery gear. For example is the kinetic rope you mention. My rope may be pricey (VooDoo) at $150 on sale, but I wouldn't use one that cost less than $100. Working once is one thing, but it generally takes more than one snatch to free a truck. A rope that can survive abuse for up to 4 attempts is highly recommended. Then in 2 days should be ready to roll again if kept relatively clean and always keep it dry as possible. A cheaper rope may fail or not take water well. Just a thought.

I personally don't touch Hi Lift jacks, they're tricky. I use a bottle jack, likely same one you have listed. a couple of flat wood pieces and you're good to go almost anywhere. Anywhere I can't place my bottle jack, I damn sure won't try a Hi Lift.
Definitely trying to space things out.

I've had more than a few people recommend DitchPig, so I'm not too worried on that one in terms of quality, though I am still puzzling over a kinetic rope vs a kinetic snatch strap (like these from ARB). (Scratch that, evidently kinetic ropes last much longer than snatch straps.) I'm also wondering still looking into the Rhino stuff in terms of quality.

Yeah, there's a reason the Hi Lift is in the second batch of recovery gear. Only thinking of getting one if I really end up wheeling more often. Not so much for the jacking capability as the option to serve as a poor man's winch.
 
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Holy frijoles. You guys are talking way above my pay grade. I can only understand a few of the terms/brands you are using/referencing - jack, vest, rope... :oops: It is like a foreign language for me! Do they have a Babbel version for ORV-speak? Natai - your list is amazing. My wallet hurts just looking at it, but I appreciate it so much. I have to earn some more in-class credits before venturing out, I feel!
 

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Vern

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Just a comment on winches. I am not going to even consider mounting a winch until there is a solution that doesn't block the camera or the acc. In the meantime I will carry my Wyeth Scott more power puller. Has 35' of synthetic line, can dead lift 6,000 lb., line pull 12,000 lb. Have a 50' 3/8" synthetic rope winch line extension that I rig with a snatch block so I can get a full 30' pull before I have to re-rig to pull additional distance. Also, have a 150' 1/2 synthetic rope winch line extension, steel shackles, soft shackles. I would definitely recommend synthetic line and soft shackles over steel cable, chain or steel shackles when hand winching for safety. I use all this for pulling down trees but can do double duty to replace a winch. Definitely better than trying to hand winch with a hi-lift jack. I haven't seen anyone mention tree saver straps for recovery gear either. Would recommend at least two so you can redirect the pull if needed. This can also increase safety by taking you out of the line of fire. If you are going to carry a hi-lift jack get the accessory to hook onto the rim directly to lift. Lifts quicker as you are picking up the tire first and not the suspension. This will get the recovery boards under the tire faster with less time and travel on the jack.
 

MadMan4BamaNATL

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Definitely trying to space things out.

I've had more than a few people recommend DitchPig, so I'm not too worried on that one in terms of quality, though I am still puzzling over a kinetic rope vs a kinetic snatch strap (like these from ARB). (Scratch that, evidently kinetic ropes last much longer than snatch straps.) I'm also wondering still looking into the Rhino stuff in terms of quality.

Yeah, there's a reason the Hi Lift is in the second batch of recovery gear. Only thinking of getting one if I really end up wheeling more often. Not so much for the jacking capability as the option to serve as a poor man's winch.
Ok, the Hi Lift Jack as a winch or pull along does make more sense, but takes some time and work to get right and can still be dangerous.

I think you're fine with the Rhino stuff you've listed, but go where your research takes you. For most stuff, mid pack to mid high are safe spots to be in. Cheap is trouble.

Yes, the kinetic rope is much better and more durable. Like I mentioned, rarely will you get someone unstuck on the first snatch, the timing alone usually kills the first try. Also, most times stuck means muck. So you're stuck either in mud, in mud, snow, or a ditch with loose soil. A strap hates to get too dirty, the rope and some shackles (I prefer soft), can save you and are much safer. I always check someone's gear before I agree to help them and use their shit. Men can be cheap bastards to our own peril.

Voodoo, Bubba Rope, Warn, and ARB make kinetic rope that I trust. There are likely others that are of similar quality, but I'm only going to speak to what I've either used or seen by guys I've been out with.

Further, I now only use Kinetic rope or my winch not a snatch strap. Again, timing and being a new vehicle. Snatch straps are for older rigs and pickups in my opinion. If you've seen a slack pull once, you'll understand my philosophy here. This is why the investment in Kinetic rope is critical, as you'd be surprised what type of muck your shiny new Bronco will get stuck in. Most of this is fault of tires and driver error, but shouldn't be cause for a damaged rig or other worst case scenarios. This makes traction boards so important. MaxTrax are the only I will touch, that cheap plastic shit is useless; may as well use kitty litter (works great in snow or mud).

If you go wheel, you will get caught in rain, and you will end up using recovery gear for yourself or to save someone else.

Anyway, you're on down the road with your targeted kit and have the time to build it right the first time since your head is in the right place on what you need. I've kept up with your posts, I'm a fan, you're gonna be a mad dog wheeler in no time at all! :cool:
 

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During the waiting times between reservations, orders, March 19, production start, and delivery - I am just curious what other accessories and/or preparations others are doing to stay occupied. In particular, things outside of the "official" published accessories list already posted. For me, in no particular order:

1. Custom license plate
2. Bronco6G Stigger (thanks, Ashley)
3. Sasquatch sticker
4. ARB compressor
5. Horse whinny horn
6. Whiskey to celebrate "take delivery" day
7. Whip light(s), flag whips
8. Gift for dealer (who has been awesome)
9. Surfing the Bronco6g.com forums (of course)

Looking for some other ideas... new cowboy hat, event/travel planning, meet-ups, onboard coolers, etc.?
A new gun, new fishing rod, good water/mud proof boots, a train horn, light bars, those could all be great additions
 

Gotdesl

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One item I definitely want in hand before taking delivery is a quality satellite emergency locator beacon.

I might even go a step further and get a sat phone or a satellite internet hot spot.

They certainly aren’t cheap, but I plan on taking the Bronco to some pretty remote locations and think it would be a good investment.
Look into the Garmin 66i. It gives you basic two way communication outside of an emergency, has the emergency locator, friend or family can see exactly where you are if you chose to share that with them, and it's a full featured handheld GPS. I carry one with me hunting here in Colorado. It's kinda pricey, but it's cheap peace of mind. Best $600 you will ever spend if you really need it one day.
 

MadMan4BamaNATL

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Just a comment on winches. I am not going to even consider mounting a winch until there is a solution that doesn't block the camera or the acc. In the meantime I will carry my Wyeth Scott more power puller. Has 35' of synthetic line, can dead lift 6,000 lb., line pull 12,000 lb. Have a 50' 3/8" synthetic rope winch line extension that I rig with a snatch block so I can get a full 30' pull before I have to re-rig to pull additional distance. Also, have a 150' 1/2 synthetic rope winch line extension, steel shackles, soft shackles. I would definitely recommend synthetic line and soft shackles over steel cable, chain or steel shackles when hand winching for safety. I use all this for pulling down trees but can do double duty to replace a winch. Definitely better than trying to hand winch with a hi-lift jack. I haven't seen anyone mention tree saver straps for recovery gear either. Would recommend at least two so you can redirect the pull if needed. This can also increase safety by taking you out of the line of fire. If you are going to carry a hi-lift jack get the accessory to hook onto the rim directly to lift. Lifts quicker as you are picking up the tire first and not the suspension. This will get the recovery boards under the tire faster with less time and travel on the jack.
Good point on the tree protector. I use the Deadman kit (it's a brand) which comes with a very nice tree protector that you can also sling around rocks or even do a sand recovery with your spare, even though this looks dangerous as hell and something I would never try. The protector almost looks like a sort of blanket instead of being thin like a traditional strap.

I have a couple of line blankets that I place at each end of the winch line to act as dampers. Will admit I don't use them all the time but do when using bow shackles since they scare me to be honest.

I changed my steel cable to synthetic about 10 or so years ago. the steel never gave me any trouble, was much easier to clean, but the risk of failure, again, scared me into spending $450 on synthetic line and I've been happy since.
 

TiredOldMedic

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Ha ha ha, I remember your comment about LLOD. Nope, I’m still not him. My name is Nels, I run the product development team for a camping & backpacking brand called Kelty. We make high quality but affordable gear.

If you camp frequently a good down sleeping bag is a worthy investment that will last a lifetime. SP21 Kelty product should be arriving soon, give it a month or so and then go look for the new Cosmic Down 550 bags. It’s the #1 best selling down bag in the USA for the past several years. Summer trips in the CO highlands I’d recommend a good 20° bag.

I’m familiar with the Gazelle tents, hunting blind style hub tents. There very cool but you are correct, they’re bulky & heavy. Despite my access to high end gear I prefer simple x-tent style tents with two poles. Easy to set up, lightweight, compact. Lots of good choices out there. I like the Grand Mesa. Besides I never spend any time in my tent unless sleeping so a small tent is best. For hanging out look up “roadhouse tarp” from a brand called Slumberjack.

“As far north as Kentucky” ha! I grew up in MN. I don’t even consider Colorado to be cold and it was -12° last night. 😎

I’d recommend a good self inflating camping mattress over a air bed. Your sleeping mat is the #1 tool to stay warm, and I’ll tell you point blank - air beds are cold. Look for a pad called the “waypoint” arriving this spring. 3” thick. 👍

Feel free to DM me about camping gear anythime I’ll steer you straight.

PEACE
Love my Kelty TN 3.
 
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