broncosor

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After reading a hundred time on this forum that 35s will handle much worst, make more noise, increase breaking distance compared to 33s, by people who actually never compared it back to back, I started to rule out sasquatch.

Now I found this helpful video, reviewing All Season VS light AT VS agressive AT VS Mud Tires, all in 32in but with the MT tire in both 32 and 35in tire. The comparison between tire type is interesting, but let’s focus on their comparison of the same MT tire in 32 and 35 on the same vehicle.

They do compare it on dirt, gravel, wet track, dry track and mud and the result is clear: on the road, the 35in MT tire does NOT handle worst than the 32 of the same tire model, it does NOT make more noise, and it does NOT increase braking distance (on wet road that is, breaking on dry road is not tested with the 35). The Reviewer insists on these points somewhere in the video and also shows the data throughout the video.

The only area where the 35 are worst in the video is for fuel economy, obviously.

What do you think?






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kodiakisland

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What I think is that you should pick the tire type and size based on your actual needs and uses and not on some random video. I much prefer these videos from down under as there is at least an interesting accent.
 

Hemisfear

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After reading a hundred time on this forum that 35s will handle much worst, make more noise, increase breaking distance compared to 33s, by people who actually never compared it back to back, I started to rule out sasquatch.

Now I found this helpful video, reviewing All Season VS light AT VS agressive AT VS Mud Tires, all in 32in but with the MT tire in both 32 and 35in tire. The comparison between tire type is interesting, but let’s focus on their comparison of the same MT tire in 32 and 35 on the same vehicle.

They do compare it on dirt, gravel, wet track, dry track and mud and the result is clear: on the road, the 35in MT tire does NOT handle worst than the 32 of the same tire model, it does NOT make more noise, and it does NOT increase braking distance (on wet road that is, breaking on dry road is not tested with the 35). The Reviewer insists on these points somewhere in the video and also shows the data throughout the video.
The only area where the 35 are worst in the video is for fuel economy, obviously.

What do you think?

What, there’s bad information on this forum?
Well, I never!
But we have so many engineers????
Go figure...
lol
 

linbackr99

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IMO the 35's / Sasquatch just make the look . . . better!
 

Drex

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Not sure what video you watched, but the one your posted verified every negative in your original post. The hard pack and gravel showed slightly better times with the more off road focused tires as expected, wet braking on pavement showed a huge advantage for the road tires (over ten percent shorter) braking distances over the similar sized off road tires (the 315's cut that to about 5%, probably due to it being much wider and putting more rubber on the pavement than the other off road tires, yet even with that advantage, was stomped on by the basic on road truck tires). Wet handling and hydroplaning; road tire dominated over the performance of the off road tires. Dry braking, same story, on road focused tire substantially shorter braking distances than off road tires.
It seems you heard what you wanted to hear from this video. There are two items that you really should understand here; The tread pattern is what governs most of a tires performance and a taller/heavier tire will absolutely take more power to accelerate and brake than the same tread pattern tires on a smaller size (taller tire has higher mass and angular momentum, which is a fancy way of saying it takes more work to stop a heavy spinning object than a lighter spinning object at the same speed).
The drawbacks people are talking about from 33's to 35's is almost 100% from the different tread patterns and sidewall stiffness, not the size difference (they are surprisingly close in weight, which is part of the equation) The hybrid mud tires on Sasquatch are going to be worse on road especially in rain and light snow than the A/T tires on a Badlands, which will be worse than the Grabbers. It is a trade off. If you seldom go off road (and my Subaru is probably off pavement more than 3/4 of all Wranglers and it gets me places on A/S tires that might surprise you.). It depends on your usage. If you are only going to see a few thousand miles a year of gravel and off pavement use, if you don't NEED the aggressive tread of a hybrid mud over A/T, or the extra inch of ground clearance over a Badlands, then Sasquatch is purely cosmetic. Then you just have to weigh the extra costs, rougher ride (sidewall construction of the tire), and lowered on road performance against the value you place on 'the look'. Lastly, road noise. The M/T tires will get likely be louder on the road, most tires are reasonably quiet when new, as the wear slightly, that is when they start to howl. Ask the guy in the video about road noise in 30k miles.
Edit: because tread is the important factor in a tire, the similarities they showed between the 35 and the 32 are because they have the same pattern and construction
 
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Gamecock

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The bottom line is get what you want, most people who have actually had 35s on a 4x4 like them...people who haven’t make post after post saying they’re a bad idea. If the truck is a toy / weekend vehicle...the 35s all day long every time. If it’s a daily driver, then the decision is tougher.

I will say a lot more people buy a Jeep and wish they had bigger tires than buy one and wish they were smaller...probably by a factor of 10.
 

da_jokker

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I think the OPs point is that just saying that 35s handle worse than 32s is not the case and there are many conversations on this board about it.

Of course the TYPE of tire makes the most difference and that is probably what all those thread should be about instead.

The simple fact is that regardless of which Bronco Tire size you choose, those tires are going to need to be replaced at some point... and THAT is when this info comes into play. You pick your size now for the gearing, you pick you tire type/tread later when it's time to replace them.

My plan has always been to get the 35s, wish it was an AT, but when they need replacing, it will be with a better choice in 35 tires.
 
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broncosor

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Not sure what video you watched, but the one your posted verified every negative in your original post. The hard pack and gravel showed slightly better times with the more off road focused tires as expected, wet braking on pavement showed a huge advantage for the road tires (over ten percent shorter) braking distances over the similar sized off road tires (the 315's cut that to about 5%, probably due to it being much wider and putting more rubber on the pavement than the other off road tires, yet even with that advantage, was stomped on by the basic on road truck tires). Wet handling and hydroplaning; road tire dominated over the performance of the off road tires. Dry braking, same story, on road focused tire substantially shorter braking distances than off road tires.
It seems you heard what you wanted to hear from this video. There are two items that you really should understand here; The tread pattern is what governs most of a tires performance and a taller/heavier tire will absolutely take more power to accelerate and brake than the same tread pattern tires on a smaller size (taller tire has higher mass and angular momentum, which is a fancy way of saying it takes more work to stop a heavy spinning object than a lighter spinning object at the same speed).
The drawbacks people are talking about from 33's to 35's is almost 100% from the different tread patterns and sidewall stiffness, not the size difference (they are surprisingly close in weight, which is part of the equation) The hybrid mud tires on Sasquatch are going to be worse on road especially in rain and light snow than the A/T tires on a Badlands, which will be worse than the Grabbers. It is a trade off. If you seldom go off road (and my Subaru is probably off pavement more than 3/4 of all Wranglers and it gets me places on A/S tires that might surprise you.). It depends on your usage. If you are only going to see a few thousand miles a year of gravel and off pavement use, if you don't NEED the aggressive tread of a hybrid mud over A/T, or the extra inch of ground clearance over a Badlands, then Sasquatch is purely cosmetic. Then you just have to weigh the extra costs, rougher ride (sidewall construction of the tire), and lowered on road performance against the value you place on 'the look'. Lastly, road noise. The M/T tires will get likely be louder on the road, most tires are reasonably quiet when new, as the wear slightly, that is when they start to howl. Ask the guy in the video about road noise in 30k miles.
Edit: because tread is the important factor in a tire, the similarities they showed between the 35 and the 32 are because they have the same pattern and construction

Are you really comparing the 35in MT tire with the all season and AT 32?
All I am comparing are the 2 same tires: the 35in MT and the 32in MT in the video. Comparing other 32s with the 35 MT makes 0 sense since they are not the same tires.
He clearly explains the 35 MT are actually better in all metrics except fuel than the 32 MT.

If you get a sasquatch you can easily swap the tires for KO2s (same as badland) then the difference is just the size. I have seen tons of comments of people saying the size increase makes the handling worst, increases noise and breaking distance because the tire are heavier. Those are the comments I am referring too.
The fact that MT tread is noisier than a AT or all season tread is obvious we all know that already. This was never the question.
 

AcesandEights

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@broncosor

I watched the video but didn't listen to it. Seems the person didn't compare the 33" to the 35" for several of the metrics. Did he say why?
 

Laminar

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He clearly explains the 35 MT are actually better in all metrics except fuel than the 32 MT.
I didn't see a comparison of dry acceleration or handling between the 32s and 35s. The big concern I've seen here is that everyone wants the 35s because they look sweet, but they're not sure the downsides of the 35s are worth it considering that the vast majority of the time the vast majority of Broncos will be tooling around on clean, dry pavement.

The downsides most commonly considered are higher fuel consumption (confirmed by this test), and worse dry on-road manners (not tested in this test).

Nobody thinks the 35s will do poorly offroad, clearly the tread and sidewall give it an advantage in low-grip situations where the added mass of the tire isn't limiting the power transferred to the ground.
 

kodiakisland

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Other than what worked better to drift on a perfectly prepared road surface, I'm not sure what if anything there is to take from that video, for my own application. Was kind of fitting his 4WD broke though.

I use my 4wd weekly, and I've yet to encounter the perfect singular road surface. I drive down a crappy county highway to get to a crappy dirt road to get to a crappy trail. I need tires to handle all of that safely, and that usually means no drifting, on purpose anyway. Even my mud holes are not perfectly prepared for consistency.

For me, I'm more concerned with what works on all the various road surfaces I'm on, and not just when the tires are new, but when they've been subjected to the same rough conditions for 30,000 miles. Get what works, not what looks cool.
 

Old Guy

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Looks to me, like I shouldn't screw with anything but road, except for Mud, there is barely a difference off road, and quite superior on road.

I thought it was an interesting test, but the widths were different on the 32/35, so that could have changed things.

Its nothing we all don't know, except for mud and nasty rock crawling, big tires are really just for looks. Nothing wrong with that reason, but lets not pretend we need them for 95% of what most of us do. I would never take my new bronco into some mudhole. Wait for a year, ruin it in 6 months, not my cup of tea.

Actually the video made me question even my reason for going BD.

I think the Australian comparison I watched a couple days ago was pretty good, and had a different contrast on 35's and 33's.

Regardless, I found it an interesting video, and felt they tried to be unbiased.
 

JHawk

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A nice compliment to this video would be one with similar tests in winter conditions
 

edgeflyer

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The reason people say 35's are bad on the road is because they run 60 psi in them because they are E rated or they have poorly designed tread patterns. If brakes are marginal for 32's you could see reduced braking effectiveness with 35's.
 

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