Here’s why you won’t see an electric Bronco

Pancho Kornwallace

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Biggest problem with our grid is what you might call the, "Wizzard of OZ" complex. Its all done by the man no one has ever seen, behind a curtain we're not allowed to peek behind. Consider:

Ownership: 100% private

Administration:
  • FERC
  • NERC X 8
  • NARUC X 50

59 regulators....What could possibly go wrong???
The biggest problem for Texas is that they cut themselves off from the US Grid to avoid regulations.

There has not been an electricity problem of this magnitude for a very long time anywhere else in the US (Katrina or maybe the 2003 blackout?).

I mean Texas has little regulation, no? So it's not the only problem, right?
Hypothetically speaking if Texas had been part of the federally regulated sector they could have "weathered this storm" ?

Not saying regulation is great or anything, Although I do think it has its place. Food safety, Drug safety, etc

You know, like most things in life, everything in moderation. Complexity doesn't help anything.
Seems obvious that if you connect the dots, Texas would have been just fine. Look at neighboring states as a reference or even the parts of Texas that were not part of the "Texas electric grid succession plan".

And it appears that power grid regulation was a good thing. It keeps us safe. It keeps the costs reasonable. And the National grid has been stable for decades.





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Carolina Jim

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Hypothetically speaking if Texas had been part of the federally regulated sector they could have "weathered this storm" ?
Certainly not the first time texans have taken the road less traveled. In the 1930s when Social Security was founded, it was actually possible for employers to opt-out. Many did, and quite a few were in Texas. By virtue of the fact businesses come & go, most private opt-outers have long since folded.

But I believe there are still 2 texas counties operating their own social security system. From memory, they've always mirrored the fed's withholding scheme - but they 'invested' the withholding dollars rather than going the "lock-box" route. I believe their retirees enjoy monthly checks 2X+ compared to comparable SSA checks.
 

OX1

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I mean Texas has little regulation, no? So it's not the only problem, right?
Hypothetically speaking if Texas had been part of the federally regulated sector they could have "weathered this storm" ?
What would the regulations say? It would be a risk matrix. What is the risk of having prolonged below freezing temps in Texas vs the cost of every piece of energy producing infrastructure meet those every 100 year temp requirements? No one with any sense would pay for that with the known chances of it happening.
 

OX1

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The biggest problem for Texas is that they cut themselves off from the US Grid to avoid regulations.

There has not been an electricity problem of this magnitude for a very long time anywhere else in the US (Katrina or maybe the 2003 blackout?).



Seems obvious that if you connect the dots, Texas would have been just fine. Look at neighboring states as a reference or even the parts of Texas that were not part of the "Texas electric grid succession plan".

And it appears that power grid regulation was a good thing. It keeps us safe. It keeps the costs reasonable. And the National grid has been stable for decades.
Don't forget Sandy. With all the regs (NJ and Fed), many of the gas stations did not have backup gen's (had gas, couldn't get to it). Know why, because they never had this widespread and prolonged power issue before. Again, risk matrix.

I think they do now though, as we have local power outages often enough, and the gas stations are ALWAYS up now. Probably more just good business sense (again, local power outages are often enough), than any reg though
 

boxwood

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What would the regulations say?
Exactly. Would they say they had to winterize? I dunno. I wouldn't suggest one way or the other. Because I don't know.

I agree that given certain odds of something like this occurring. It isn't something to expect to have been prepared for. Unless the risk wasn't really 1/100 years.

I was thinking more that if they were part of the rest of the larger system, they would have been able to pull in power from nearby grids that didn't go out.
 

OX1

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Exactly. Would they say they had to winterize? I dunno. I wouldn't suggest one way or the other. Because I don't know.

I agree that given certain odds of something like this occurring. It isn't something to expect to have been prepared for. Unless the risk wasn't really 1/100 years.

I was thinking more that if they were part of the rest of the larger system, they would have been able to pull in power from nearby grids that didn't go out.
And how many years did they save money by not being subject to fed regs and/or being an independent grid? I'd assume a lot or what would be the point. Has that been reflected in the rates down there, you would think.

Anyway, one thing is guaranteed. A mass overaction that costs 10 times what it should.
 

boxwood

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And how many years did they save money by not being subject to fed regs and/or being an independent grid? I'd assume a lot or what would be the point. Has that been reflected in the rates down there, you would think.

Anyway, one thing is guaranteed. A mass overaction that costs 10 times what it should.

I am sure they, the power companies, did save money. Doesn't look like that trickled down to the consumer though. The rates in Texas appear to be about middle of the road. So it looks like the consumers get to pay average rates as any other regulated power cos. Where did those cost savings go?

How do those supposed cost savings compare to massive amount of bills about to hit everyone.

Compare those two actual numbers and then we'll know if it was "worth" it.

Perhaps if the reaction in Texas 10 years ago when the system failed similarly in cold was what it should have been, it would not be guaranteed to be "10 times what it should" be today.

In short, they did know it was coming and likely and chose not to fix it anyway, and there is a huge bill coming anyway, who's ultimately going to pay it?
 

graavy1999

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First off I'm really impressed with y'all's knowledge of Texas and Texas energy. I'm in Austin and while we have no water, I was lucky to have access to power, but no gas stations as they were all closed. I would have welcomed a hybrid and it's on my mind a lot now, gas is scarce in these situations and it has you just as trapped.
 

boxwood

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First off I'm really impressed with y'all's knowledge of Texas and Texas energy. I'm in Austin and while we have no water, I was lucky to have access to power, but no gas stations as they were all closed. I would have welcomed a hybrid and it's on my mind a lot now, gas is scarce in these situations and it has you just as trapped.
Lets be honest, we don't really know that much. we just like to "make conversation" lol


There were quite a few people happy to be keeping warm sleeping in their EV's in their garages.
 
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Oneand0

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I’m probably only going to keep my Badlands for about a year, or so, until I can buy one of the new Electric trucks that are coming out. Of course if they announce an Electric Bronco concept, like they just did with Jeep, I’ll wait to see what they do with that. The price of Kw low peak, compared to fuel, and no maintenance is a deal breaker for me. Not to mention solar with a battery at home, is the equivalent to having your own oil refinery and gas pump at home.
 

Lakelife36

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Our battery tech limitations may mean that we're a long ways off from mass adoption of BEVs at the overall population level, but that doesn't mean that Ford won't build one to sell at premium prices. For now though I'd be more than happy with a series-hybrid plug-in, especially if it had tank turn style functionality. I think there is a lot of potential there. I'll take mine in dual fuel for maximum versatility please.
 

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