High vs Lux package chip shortage

Lamenamehere

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Anyone know why the chip shortage is only affecting the lux package and not the high? It can’t be the radio, since it’s the same deck/screen.

So is the shortage being caused by the vehicle on board computer system that controls the lux package’s safety systems, such as stability assist and ACC?

Or is there something else that the lux package has over the high that’s going to hold up builds that I’m missing?





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Rick Astley

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Go look up what the lead time is for automotive grade boards and chipsets. That will give you some indication of what might be lacking.
 
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Lamenamehere

Lamenamehere

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Go look up what the lead time is for automotive grade boards and chipsets. That will give you some indication of what might be lacking.
I guess a better question, is what makes the Lux one of the deadly 6, when the high seems to offer many of the same features?

I assumed it was chipsets. But it would seem the high package would require the same chips.
 

Rick Astley

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How many parts are unique to Lux. And I mean every.single.part. Clips, sensors, wiring harness, dongles, canon plugs, everything.

Then trace down the parts supplier and how their resource allocation and labor is going.

Ford can't make a unit without 100% parts availability, and the higher the number of parts, the greater the odds of having a parts supply issue somewhere along the food chain.

These are the very real, very known, and very understood risks with just-in-time vehicle manufacturing with a global parts network. It simply took something to affect the human race across the globe for these risks to come good.
 

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How many parts are unique to Lux. And I mean every.single.part. Clips, sensors, wiring harness, dongles, canon plugs, everything.

Then trace down the parts supplier and how their resource allocation and labor is going.

Ford can't make a unit without 100% parts availability, and the higher the number of parts, the greater the odds of having a parts supply issue somewhere along the food chain.

These are the very real, very known, and very understood risks with just-in-time vehicle manufacturing with a global parts network. It simply took something to affect the human race across the globe for these risks to come good.
I agree with Rick. There are so many variables to start with. Then throw in this Covid crap, and what once was delicate goes to damn near completely impossible. It sux 'cause I want my Bronco, and the closer it gets the harder the wait. :)
 

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These are the very real, very known, and very understood risks with just-in-time vehicle manufacturing with a global parts network.
You should see what Just-In-Time manufacturing has done to repairs on Teslas...
Cars that get in fender benders are waiting 3-4 *months* for parts, because every single thing is allocated for the production line and nothing else.

definitely some credit to Ford (and everyone else for that matter) for understanding that cars need spare parts, and that's just all there is to it.
 
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Lamenamehere

Lamenamehere

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How many parts are unique to Lux. And I mean every.single.part. Clips, sensors, wiring harness, dongles, canon plugs, everything.

Then trace down the parts supplier and how their resource allocation and labor is going.

Ford can't make a unit without 100% parts availability, and the higher the number of parts, the greater the odds of having a parts supply issue somewhere along the food chain.

These are the very real, very known, and very understood risks with just-in-time vehicle manufacturing with a global parts network. It simply took something to affect the human race across the globe for these risks to come good.
I see what you’re saying, and would agree. But to me, it would also stand to reason that there should be other options added to the deadly 6, like the automatic which is computer controlled and according to some articles one of the parts that is being held up by the chip shortage. Anyway, thanks for the insight!
 

Rick Astley

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You should see what Just-In-Time manufacturing has done to repairs on Teslas...
Cars that get in fender benders are waiting 3-4 *months* for parts, because every single thing is allocated for the production line and nothing else.

definitely some credit to Ford (and everyone else for that matter) for understanding that cars need spare parts, and that's just all there is to it.
I mentioned this to a friend who got a taxpayer-mobile and he told me that it wasn't as much of a problem as it used to be.

So naturally I asked a different buddy who owns a body shop and he told me that Tesla wanted them to invest $20-30K into tools and equipment to be able to diagnose if the cars would burst into flame while sitting in his body shop. He politely declined. A friend of his has a larger body shop who spend the money to become an authorized Tesla repair shop...... The stories from that guy are that Tesla will send you anything they have, then once you paint and install it onto the car needing repairs, they will deny your work, or suddenly change the price of parts (just-in-time-pricing!) which always ends up screwing the body shop over. Either it forces the costs to insurance, who deny the additional expenses, or it forces the shop to cover it off the jump.

I'm so proud that America has subsidized $1,800,000,000 in Tesla sales so they can be owned by the wealthy needy.

When Tesla eventually develops their second vehicle (since all their current vehicles are essentially the same with shared components minus body parts) and it doesn't have full backwards compatibility, I'm going to laugh my ass off when Tesla discovers it has to make all those expired parts available for 10 more years, and at volume which is not one-off hand-made exotic Italian boots. Oh, who are we kidding, Tesla won't make a new vehicle, it can't afford it.

Meanwhile over here, I can't even get Ford to honor the 40K mile warranty on my Thunderbird. They say just because it's 60 years old, it's out of warranty period... There were no time limitations on the original warranty documents (which, naturally, I have). 23K miles on the clock and Ford has refused warranty service. Mr. Levine can expect a very stern twatting on his twit account come Monday morning!
 

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When Tesla eventually develops their second vehicle
Quoting just this bit since it's a long post, but I do still objectively think that Tesla's drive and battery technology is 100% at the top of the market. The next one that's even close is Audi, and they're five years behind. But I'm mostly in agreement, I don't think tesla will be making cars long term. I sincerely hope that either Ford or VW/Audi pick up their tech or partner somehow, since those companies seem to be the only ones capable of looking into a future 20 years from now and seeing themselves in it.

I mean, a Cybertruck is uglier than sin, but if you could get a cybertruck that was built like a Super Duty? sign me up for that.
 

Rick Astley

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I see what you’re saying, and would agree. But to me, it would also stand to reason that there should be other options added to the deadly 6, like the automatic which is computer controlled and according to some articles one of the parts that is being held up by the chip shortage. Anyway, thanks for the insight!
It seems you're trying to associate specific content specifically to global chip shortages. I'm not sure that you'll be able to gain the insight to make that direct "1+2=3" connection as such information would be kept under lock and key by the OEM, lest it cause other supply disruptions. It will certainly impact UAW negotiations.

From what i've followed of the matter, OEM's have about a 48 month lead time on ordering and what has been delivered over the past few months is just about the last of what they will be able to reliably obtain in known quantities.

We also don't know what inventory level of chip components Ford has been sitting on or when they obtained inventory in preparation of vehicle production.

Now, i'm speaking out my arse on the next part as I have no experience with the accounting practices used by auto manufacturers, but if they follow some other industries in converting materials into a product, they likely use FIFO (First In First Out) valuation methodology as they generally don't intend to sit on inventory items any longer than necessary. It only being February, we're looking at quite a while to get any sort of info from financial statements or investment analysis reports about Ford that would allude to how dire the situation is fleet wide.
 

Rick Astley

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Quoting just this bit since it's a long post, but I do still objectively think that Tesla's drive and battery technology is 100% at the top of the market. The next one that's even close is Audi, and they're five years behind. But I'm mostly in agreement, I don't think tesla will be making cars long term. I sincerely hope that either Ford or VW/Audi pick up their tech or partner somehow, since those companies seem to be the only ones capable of looking into a future 20 years from now and seeing themselves in it.

I mean, a Cybertruck is uglier than sin, but if you could get a cybertruck that was built like a Super Duty? sign me up for that.
Cybertruck won't be a reality unless it's something other than the 1-off they made. What they did make doesn't comply with very many regs and can't even fit on US roadways, let alone go into production.

I was alluding to Tesla's second vehicle which will have an entirely different ECU, power needs, cooling and regulation, and haptic interface. They are constantly adjusting what chip components go into their products (typical if your car is a desktop computer), but let's just say that things like USB connectors aren't eternal, they eventually get replaced by a better technology or advancement that simply cannot stay backwards compatible. Their electric motors or braking systems, those are all simple enough. Tesla is essentially tethered to the headphone jack on your cell phone. The only capital which exists to get them out of manufactured obsolescence is tax dollars or pie-in-the-sky cash-calls through vaporware (Cybertruck is a good example here). Which still doesn't address the legacy costs of automotive manufacturing that, my guess, is Elton Musk thinks he can pay off some politicians to avoid, or assumes his golden forked tongue will net him some immunity from reality (it won't and it can't).
 

Rick Astley

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Good luck getting THAT registered in arizona, I already HAVE that plate, MUAHAHAHAHAH

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You can have that. Switching from cars to an off-road vehicle, I need A NEW START with my plate.

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