I really hope the Bronco’s hybrid system is similar to the RAV4 prime

Nickp

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https://techcrunch.com/2020/05/29/t...hybrid-rav4-prime-priced-a-skosh-under-40000/

300 horsepower, 42 miles of electric range? And the Bronco would presumably be a turbo 4 not electric so it would probably be pushing closer to 400 horsepower. Would be pretty sweet.



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BroncoBoy22

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Yup! 42 miles of range would be perfect for me too!


What I wonder is what speeds can you go in all electric? Can you get up 80 mph without it kicking the motor on?
 

dmtndan

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I’ll take any configuration where I can get 25+ mpg average and/or 500+ miles of range. Honestly I think a hybrid would be great, could also be very useful for off-roading. (No I do not wish to argue this point, just seeing the pros and acknowledging the cons)
 

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Possibly. The Toyota Prius Prime is limited to 84mph in all electric mode.
That would work! 70-80mph is a good cruising speed on the freeways in CA.

I’d literally prob only use the motor once per week (after the break in period) just to get the fluids circulated and keep the seals lubricated.
 

securitysix

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I know some of y'all are excited about the hybrid, and I hope it's awesome for y'all's sake, but unless it's the cheapest engine option, it's out of the running for me.

The advertised all electric ranges are probably optimistic, and even if they're not, they'd still fall short of making my daily commute. I'd still have to crank the engine about 10 miles out if I wanted to make it home.

Even running in normal gas/hybrid mode, sure, more fuel economy is nice, but it's a heavier vehicle with more expensive maintenance. I just don't know why I'd pay extra for that.
 

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I know some of y'all are excited about the hybrid, and I hope it's awesome for y'all's sake, but unless it's the cheapest engine option, it's out of the running for me.

The advertised all electric ranges are probably optimistic, and even if they're not, they'd still fall short of making my daily commute. I'd still have to crank the engine about 10 miles out if I wanted to make it home.

Even running in normal gas/hybrid mode, sure, more fuel economy is nice, but it's a heavier vehicle with more expensive maintenance. I just don't know why I'd pay extra for that.
I’m asking out of ignorance, why would maintenance be more expensive?

if anything it might be cheaper. Less miles on the engine should be less wear and tear.
 

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The advertised all electric ranges are probably optimistic, and even if they're not, they'd still fall short of making my daily commute.
Our Fusion EH gets its advertised mileage all summer and if in garage in the winter.
We get 21 "free" miles. The estimated cost of a full charge is the same as having a lightbulb on the whole night. I would not think twice about a lamp on, and we love the "Free" miles.

She has not put gas in her car since COVID started.
Almost 3 months of local travel with zero refills.

If the Bronco can do 25+ of EV before swapping I am all in.
Will probably lease Year 1 model for 3 years and see what develops before I buy the next Gen in EH.

Wife leases her Fusion, but she has had two EH and we have had ZERO maintenance other than recalls across the two vehicles in over 6 years. I would not anticipate the maintenance to be much higher on a long term owner unless you get to the point of the battery failing.
 

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If anything the Bronco Hybrid is going to be close to what the Explorer/Aviator has or the new 2021 F-150 Hybrid.
 

securitysix

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I’m asking out of ignorance, why would maintenance be more expensive?

if anything it might be cheaper. Less miles on the engine should be less wear and tear.
The batteries used in the hybrids are stupidly expensive. Ford warranties their hybrid batteries for 80,000 miles, but when you have to replace one after that, you're looking at $2,000 to $4,000 just for the battery itself, plus whatever the labor cost is. And if you're one of those "well, I do all of my own maintenance/repairs" types, that's cool, but you still have to ask yourself what your time is worth.

Temperature fluctuations also affect the effectiveness and lifespan of batteries. If your vehicle sits out in the heat or the cold or both, it will affect your battery.

Fully charging and discharging the battery (trying to use all 42 miles of that claimed pure electric range, for example) also negatively affects the life of the battery.

You will have to replace the hybrid battery if you own the vehicle long enough. That's just part of owning a hybrid vehicle.

You're going to be running the gas engine at some point, even if you're maximizing your full electric usage, and it's still going to need all of the standard PMCS. The hybrid battery is an additional maintenance cost, not a replacement maintenance cost.
 

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You will have to replace the hybrid battery if you own the vehicle long enough. That's just part of owning a hybrid vehicle.
Ford normally designs components to last about 150K miles before a major failure.

My brother in law has a 2010 Fusion Hybrid and has well over 150K on it and doesn't have a battery issue with it.
 

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Yeah I get what securitysix is saying. I just haven’t come across the fears in the real world. I asked my service advisor who I’ve know for years and he said they haven’t had any issues with the fusion hybrids. Much the same feedback as Sherminiator and BHShaman is what he told me.

Yes the engine will still need preventative maintenance, but in my use case it will only be run on long trips and when I just want to run it to circulate all the fluids. I don’t anticipate higher costs unless something catastrophic happens. I have 2 other vehicles. It’s gonna take me a long time to get to 80k or 150k before I have to start worrying about battery replacement
 

BHShaman

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The batteries used in the hybrids are stupidly expensive. Ford warranties their hybrid batteries for 80,000 miles, but when you have to replace one after that, you're looking at $2,000 to $4,000 just for the battery itself, plus whatever the labor cost is.
OR.... you just leave it a Hybrid and have all the benefits of a hybrid, but you had the benefit if "free" miles for 8 years. Most batteries don't have complete failure and maintain enough charge to power all the pre-start essentials and driving boost. Most EV/EH are now going well above their advertised lifespan.

Battery lifespan listing are a litigation prevention tool. If you advertise 150k and it goes 100k, you get sued. If you advertise 80k and you get 100k people think they got a "good one". Batteries can't really be measured in miles anyway, they are measured in depletions/recharge cycles (4 partial depletion/recharges may equal one cycle if 25% depleted each time). You can't predict how many cycles people are going to take per miles due to driving methods and environmental factors so they come up with a mileage number almost everyone will surpass to avoid litigation.
Like Mayo... does that ever expire? Delicious.
 
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