MPG Difference Between the 2.3 and 2.7?

TripleB

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What is the MPG going to be for these engines?
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RedTetsu13

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I test drove both the F150 and Ranger and got almost the exact same fuel economy (was off by about .5-1 mpg depending on the situation). My advice is see if your ford dealer will let you do a test drive and you can see for yourself. My test driving loop involves me taking manual control of any auto gearbox and then doing about a (50/50) split loop between hwy and city. I also did it in the middle of a Michigan winter which basically required me to be in 4H which also drags down mpg.
 

Mattwings

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I don’t have direct experience with the current 2.3l, but my actual, long term average with the 2.7l in my F150 Crew Cab 4x4 with 3.55 gears is just under 20. (19.6). I would say I drive somewhat aggressively (not by MI standards). Highway speeds average 78. I got 21.6 combined on my 400 mile trip to the cottage this weekend. Ford is notorious for needing break in time to achieve better economy and my 2.7 has been the same. At Around 15-18k the mileage stabilized at the 19.8 range. Prior it was at The hi 17 to low 18 range. I would expect if you concentrate on economy the 2.3 and manual could deliver 23 or 24 in the same driving loop, based on my reading several reviews and users posts and the 2.7 could do 21 or 22. The 2.7 creates and addictive thrust that I must experience regularly, so not exactly sure how good it could be ?? your mileage may vary:)
 
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What is the MPG going to be for these engines?
Are you pressing the pedal to the floor as often as possible? Driving around with three obese friends? Up hill, into the wind?

AFAIK Bronco will be the first product to offer both so it's a bit of comparing apples to cantelopes to figure out efficiency with the current models.
 

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I averaged 21/26 In my 4x4 2.7 F-150 with 6 speed and 3:55 gears. That is if I wasn't heavy on the pedal. Which is hard to do with the 2.7. Worst I ever got was 17/20 when it was really cold.
 
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TripleB

TripleB

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I know, I know, I know. I don't really care about the MPG either, just curious. I was thinking about 2.3 range. Is it more? It sounds like they will likely be very close in MPG.
 

Used2jeep

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I checked Ranger vs 2.7 F150 and IIRC Ranger was 21-24 and F150 was 18-23
 

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The MPG varies greatly with EcoBoost engines on how you drive them, but you can probably expect them to be pretty close to one another, maybe 1-2MPG difference.
 

The_Phew

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Gas engines are most efficient (thermodynamically, i.e. chemical energy to mechanical energy) near wide open throttle (WOT); the more closed the throttle, the more throttle losses and the higher the specific fuel consumption (SFC=fuel burned per unit power produced). A smaller engine operated with a more open throttle will generally be more efficient at low-load conditions (i.e. highway cruising). At high RPMs, these throttle losses are near-zero, but the friction losses are high, so the sweet spot is usually cruising at ~2300 RPM in top gear with the throttle mostly open. This, combined with the lower weight of the 2.3L vs. the 2.7L will probably work out to a ~10% longer highway range with the 2.3L.

Diesels don't have a throttle, which is why they are such efficient highway cruisers (combined with diesel just having more hydrogen molecules per gallon of fuel than gas AND diesels having high compression ratios). They are most efficient sitting at low-load conditions.
 

elseminoleguapo

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I wouldn't expect good mpg on the 2.3 and wouldn't be surprised if it's almost identical in real world usage to the v6. My girlfriend has a 2.3 mustang 10 spd and it averages about 21 in the city. The Bronco will be about 1k lb heavier. Don't get your hopes up.
 

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Gas engines are most efficient (thermodynamically, i.e. chemical energy to mechanical energy) near wide open throttle (WOT); the more closed the throttle, the more throttle losses and the higher the specific fuel consumption (SFC=fuel burned per unit power produced). A smaller engine operated with a more open throttle will generally be more efficient at low-load conditions (i.e. highway cruising). At high RPMs, these throttle losses are near-zero, but the friction losses are high, so the sweet spot is usually cruising at ~2300 RPM in top gear with the throttle mostly open. This, combined with the lower weight of the 2.3L vs. the 2.7L will probably work out to a ~10% longer highway range with the 2.3L.

Diesels don't have a throttle, which is why they are such efficient highway cruisers (combined with diesel just having more hydrogen molecules per gallon of fuel than gas AND diesels having high compression ratios). They are most efficient sitting at low-load conditions.
 
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