grayshadow

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6/3/22 Update:

Fuel pump failure confirmed. Covered under warranty. Parts have been ordered (ETA TBD). Loaner vehicle was provided.

6/1/22 Update:

The trail recovery was successful; now being serviced by local dealer. (Photos of the recovery here.)

5/31/22 Original Post:

My Bronco (2.7L) died today, deep into a remote trail… about 4 miles into a 10-mile-long trail with steep elevation changes, tight turns between narrow groups of trees, and deep mud holes. :(

That’s it below… hood up, exactly where it died, going down a decline with 21 degree pitch, trailing behind @kodiakisland's Bronco.

1ED6BE79-AC9A-4F96-B698-75735C4E2D6D.jpeg


For background, @kodiakisland and I were scouting potential trails for the next NWA trail run on June 14th, and @kodiakisland had briefly stopped for a photo, so I pulled up behind him with my foot on the brake. When the engine started to lug, I put the transmission in neutral, engaged the electronic parking brake, and then put the vehicle into park, and it immediately died.

Numerous attempts were made to get it to re-start, but the engine appears to be starved for fuel. The first thing I checked was the fuel pump fuse (Fuse #4, 30A, in the Under Hood Fuse Box), which was fine. The tank was 3/4 full after being topped off this morning with half a tank of regular unleaded before departure. No signs of water in the fuel tank. Popped the cover off the air filter housing and confirmed that the air filter is not clogged or otherwise blocked. The battery is fully charged and alternator is functioning well (i.e., both confirmed by meters on the IP display, 12.4V on battery, 13.3V with alternator charging under load at speed). The starter fires continuously like normal. The crankshaft turns smoothly, and the engine tries to fire, and sometimes does for one stroke, but then dies again. I also disconnected the battery and waited 20 minutes before retrying, but the results were the same.

My instinctive guess is a fuel pump failure (possibly infant mortality; 2,490 miles on the odometer), based on other recent threads posted on the forum, but I haven't had a chance to pull any Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) or study the Technical Service Manual (TSM) for other possible problems. The vehicle is well beyond cell phone coverage, so it is unlikely that any DTCs would have been uploaded into the Mothership’s tracking system. If it's a fuel pump failure, that is going to present a difficult trail-side fix, because the gas tank will have to be dropped to access the pump.

Unfortunately, it's also going to be difficult to tow out for recovery, because of the aforementioned difficult trail access. :(

So the bad news is we pulled my Bronco off to the side of the trail and temporarily abandoned it deep in the woods this afternoon, and it is sitting on the trail side all alone in the dark tonight. 🙁

The good news is I hitched a ride home with @kodiakisland (Never wheel alone!), got some great photos, and saw three deer today! :)
Sorry to hear you were stranded. Love exploring Arkansas. Will be back in mid May for the Rendezvous in the Ozarks event.


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Dads_bronze_bronco

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Seeing the recovery pics makes me regret selling my chainsaw after I moved back from the mountains down to a nice retirement community; and it was a nice saw. Could have used it for off road adventures for sure, dummy me sold and then months later decided to buy a Bronco.

Tools are tools, I should always keep them... except the electric pole saw. Haha.
Yeah, the biggest impediment to downsizing is there are very few options with the third garage with extra room for a shop …
 

BluebroncoNC

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It would be interesting to know if there is a difference between the 2.7/2.3 in delivery requirements or if there is a difference in 2dr/4dr with different size tanks.
Hit up the parts department at your local Ford dealership... They'll tell ya.
 

rmanecke

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Glad you got it out of the woods and back to the dealer. That was the best move.

I do wonder if you (theoretically) could have installed an in-line out of tank fuel pump (like I have on my old jeep) just to get it out of there, or if the in tank failed pump would impede the flow of fuel. Idle thoughts while I mark the days to two years without a build notice yet.
 

TyGuy40

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Well, if it makes you feel any better, I have 6,800 miles on my 2dr BL with the 2.3 7M and I have not had a single problem. My brother and I are going to the MX Nationals at Thunder Valley in Lakewood. We are leaving next Thursday morning. I'm not worried at all!
But I have the 2.7, which appears to be the one having issues. :(
 

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Razorbak86

Razorbak86

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Is there a rollover switch like on the old rangers? I recall needed to reset that switch on several occasions in my 1988 ranger....lol. it could be triggered by steep angles?
There's not a physical inertia switch any more but there is some impact detection in the restraints module that can kill the fuel pump after a hard impact. I think it would take a really hard knock to trigger it and also I would expect it to show a message on the cluster saying it was activated.
Thanks for this.
I answers a LOT of questions I had.
I assumed they had inertia switches still.
Also did not know FP was regulated at the pump. Again, assumed it was more downstream toward the intake.
Any day you learn something new is a good day.
I was trying to give him advice based on old tech, apparently.
Is there a fuel pump shut off reset switch on the Bronco's? I know that you are probably on top of this but maybe when you were bumping around you might have triggered the safety switch that pops in the event of an emergency. Just a thought.
Apparently not.
At least not in the sense I thought there was (used to be) on vehicles.

https://www.bronco6g.com/forum/thre...y-deep-into-a-remote-trail.45800/post-1436031
Now that the vehicle is in the shop, I have been able to spend a little time digging around in the TSM, and I found this info about the Fuel Pump Shut-Off Feature (highlighted)...

Fuel System Overview - 2.7L EcoBoost.jpg


Since I turned the ignition off and back on again multiple times, including a hard reset of the battery, this was not likely the reason for the fuel pump shut-off.
 
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Razorbak86

Razorbak86

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For those interested in the technical details related to this repair, the general info, specifications, diagnostics, and procedures are all attached in the PDFs below:
  • Fuel System - General Information - Specifications - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel System Overview - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel System Diagnosis and Testing - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel System Pressure Check - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel System Pressure Release - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Spring Lock Couplings - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Quick Release Coupling - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Tank Draining - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Tank and Lines - System Operation and Component Description - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Tank and Lines - Diagnosis and Testing - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Level Sender - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Pump and Sender Unit - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Tank - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor and Tube - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Charging and Controls - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Charging and Controls - System Charging and Component Description - 2.7L EcoBoost
  • Fuel Pump Driver Module (FPDM) - 2.7L EcoBoost
 

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mpeugeot

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That's a complex fuel delivery system and looks like a complete PITA. If I was going to guess a failure mode, it would be one of two things.

First, I would listen for any pump activation/sound. It would be really odd for the pump to shell itself out this early without any real warnings or funky sounds signaling its imminent demise. Assuming that there were no sounds or attempts to make pressure, I found this little nugget: "The FRP sensor sensor is located on the fuel rail and provides a feedback signal to indicate the fuel rail pressure to the PCM . The PCM uses the fuel rail pressure (FRP) signal to command the correct injector timing and pulse width for correct fuel delivery at all speed and load conditions. The FRP sensor, along with the fuel volume regulator (part of the fuel injection pump), form a closed loop fuel pressure control system.

An electrically faulted FRP sensor sensor results in the deactivation of the fuel injection pump. Fuel pressure to injectors is then provided only by the fuel pump (FP) assembly."

The FRP sensor is my number 2 culprit. Number 1 would be a lose connector on the fuel management module.
 

mbagne

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Man!
Sorry about your fun becoming a nightmare in the middle of BFE. I keep thinking why am I still waiting for my $61K Bronco WT, if I'm going to feel unsure while driving in the boonies with an over 60% chance of breaking down. I keep reading all of these issues a lot of you are encountering when having fun. Not a good fuzzy feeling. :poop:☠
Good luck on your recovery ✌🤞
60% chance of breaking down?? How do you figure that? How many breakdowns are we reading about that leave a Bronco inoperable? There is already 100,000 Broncos (plus or minus) out there by now, so even with 1,000 breakdowns that would be 1%. Sure, more breakdowns will be occurring, but also more Broncos are continuing to hit the roadways. We get concentrated reporting on this Forum (and other Bronco sites) from only a small cross section of Bronco owners so we think we are seeing a ton of problems, but spread out amongst all Broncos on the roadways across the country, it is a VERY small percentage.
 

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biswamberpal

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6/3/22 Update:

Fuel pump failure confirmed. Covered under warranty. Parts have been ordered (ETA TBD). Loaner vehicle was provided.

6/1/22 Update:

The trail recovery was successful; now being serviced by local dealer. (Photos of the recovery here.)

5/31/22 Original Post:

My Bronco (2.7L) died today, deep into a remote trail… about 4 miles into a 10-mile-long trail with steep elevation changes, tight turns between narrow groups of trees, and deep mud holes. :(

That’s it below… hood up, exactly where it died, going down a decline with 21 degree pitch, trailing behind @kodiakisland's Bronco.

1ED6BE79-AC9A-4F96-B698-75735C4E2D6D.jpeg


For background, @kodiakisland and I were scouting potential trails for the next NWA trail run on June 14th, and @kodiakisland had briefly stopped for a photo, so I pulled up behind him with my foot on the brake. When the engine started to lug, I put the transmission in neutral, engaged the electronic parking brake, and then put the vehicle into park, and it immediately died.

Numerous attempts were made to get it to re-start, but the engine appears to be starved for fuel. The first thing I checked was the fuel pump fuse (Fuse #4, 30A, in the Under Hood Fuse Box), which was fine. The tank was 3/4 full after being topped off this morning with half a tank of regular unleaded before departure. No signs of water in the fuel tank. Popped the cover off the air filter housing and confirmed that the air filter is not clogged or otherwise blocked. The battery is fully charged and alternator is functioning well (i.e., both confirmed by meters on the IP display, 12.4V on battery, 13.3V with alternator charging under load at speed). The starter fires continuously like normal. The crankshaft turns smoothly, and the engine tries to fire, and sometimes does for one stroke, but then dies again. I also disconnected the battery and waited 20 minutes before retrying, but the results were the same.

My instinctive guess is a fuel pump failure (possibly infant mortality; 2,490 miles on the odometer), based on other recent threads posted on the forum, but I haven't had a chance to pull any Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) or study the Technical Service Manual (TSM) for other possible problems. The vehicle is well beyond cell phone coverage, so it is unlikely that any DTCs would have been uploaded into the Mothership’s tracking system. If it's a fuel pump failure, that is going to present a difficult trail-side fix, because the gas tank will have to be dropped to access the pump.

Unfortunately, it's also going to be difficult to tow out for recovery, because of the aforementioned difficult trail access. :(

So the bad news is we pulled my Bronco off to the side of the trail and temporarily abandoned it deep in the woods this afternoon, and it is sitting on the trail side all alone in the dark tonight. 🙁

The good news is I hitched a ride home with @kodiakisland (Never wheel alone!), got some great photos, and saw three deer today! :)
glad to know, problem is identified, and you were able to remover safe. You faced problem, but am sure like me, we learned from your experience, hope and wish ford learns too and fixes this for every bronco that is coming out of MAP. By the way nice photos too...
 

mpeugeot

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60% chance of breaking down?? How do you figure that? How many breakdowns are we reading about that leave a Bronco inoperable? There is already 100,000 Broncos (plus or minus) out there by now, so even with 1,000 breakdowns that would be 1%.
I think that this is a very good point. While there are certainly some weak points that may need to be addressed, in general, the likelihood of a catastrophic failure does appear to be lower than 1% per 10k miles driven (and I would argue it's lower than that but I don't have data to support that).

However, a 1% warranty repair rate for any manufacturer would be catastrophic, which is why the hardtops were such a big deal, because letting them leave the factory would have incurred huge costs to repair under warranty (even though I wanted my dirt mountain Bronco released at the time).

I know that it's anecdotal, but the fact is that my Bronco has made it 23,000 miles in just over 6 months. During that time, I had 2 parking brake warnings (which were obvious false alarms) and no other errors. Fuel mileage has continued to improve (last 1427 miles has been between 21-23 mpg despite the fact that I am not gentle on the throttle). I have been very impressed with the vehicle in many, many ways.

It quite possibly is one of the best vehicles that I have ever owned (with the notable exception of the B&O stereo system's weak ass speakers).

This is not to discount anyone else who has had significant problems. A early fuel pump failure is cause for concern (especially if there is a developing trend towards early failure) and is as serious as a motor failure, due to the fact that failure can leave a person in a dangerous situation, especially in an off-road vehicle.

Honestly, I was expecting the motor failures to become much more prolific, but thankfully it has been far fewer than I expected (and I have a motor in the middle of the danger zone). A fuel pump failure would suck, but at the end of the day, it's still a warranty repair. I just wish that Ford had included some form of trail recovery for people who are going to be putting the Bronco out in the wild.

At the end of the day, despite the many things that Ford has done a piss poor job with (like communication), overall, the Bronco is amazing.
 

Kenneth_R

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That's a complex fuel delivery system and looks like a complete PITA. If I was going to guess a failure mode, it would be one of two things.

First, I would listen for any pump activation/sound. It would be really odd for the pump to shell itself out this early without any real warnings or funky sounds signaling its imminent demise. Assuming that there were no sounds or attempts to make pressure, I found this little nugget: "The FRP sensor sensor is located on the fuel rail and provides a feedback signal to indicate the fuel rail pressure to the PCM . The PCM uses the fuel rail pressure (FRP) signal to command the correct injector timing and pulse width for correct fuel delivery at all speed and load conditions. The FRP sensor, along with the fuel volume regulator (part of the fuel injection pump), form a closed loop fuel pressure control system.

An electrically faulted FRP sensor sensor results in the deactivation of the fuel injection pump. Fuel pressure to injectors is then provided only by the fuel pump (FP) assembly."

The FRP sensor is my number 2 culprit. Number 1 would be a lose connector on the fuel management module.
It is complex since it has both direct injection (very high pressure) and manifold injection. The system in the 2.3 is a bit simpler.
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