Non-sas Suspension quality [question]

dgorsett

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Here is that chart thanks to @North7

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I always found it interesting that the BD has different shocks than the Base, BB nd OBX, anybody know what's up with that?
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Anybody with actual offroad experience between regular broncos and sas/badlands? Figure we all know most of the tech by now, but thanks for the refresh. I just want to know if a BD is gonna shake up my wife too much offroad/our rough road?
 

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Well, when you talk about suspensions, it includes the control arms and links that locate the axles, as well as the type of springs and the shocks, and any sway bars. The control arms, links, and sway bars are the same with non-SaS and Sas. Only the coilovers, which are the springs and the shocks, are different. So, axle location and sway bar control is the same. Also, spring rates are likely very close to the same if not exactly the same for each model. So, the real difference in SaS is the position sensitive shocks and the additional 1" lift in ride height. The ride height increase is specifically to make room for the 35" tires. The position sensitive shocks should make a difference in how the Bronco feels/rides off road. The shock valving (resistance to motion) increase as the shock shaft gets closer to fully compressed or fully extended, so the vehicle can ride better going over rougher terrain.

The stock non-SaS springs and shocks are still specifically tuned to the vehicle, and the rest of the suspension is the same. While I have only driven a SaS off road, I would assume that the difference in feel and ride would mostly be noticed as you pushed the Bronco harder off road. Just driving around on dirt roads at a leisurely pace you might not feel a difference.

To be a bit more specific, the front suspension is IFS (independent front suspension) and uses upper and lower A arms (control arms) with bushings at the frame end and ball joints at the knuckle end, and the front has a sway bar (anti-roll bar). The rear is a straight axle, and it has four links (control arms) to locate the axle fore and aft, and handle axle torque, and it has a track bar to locate the axle side to side. No sway bar. All of these parts are the same, SaS or non-SaS. Then both have coilover shocks, which means the springs are mounted to the shocks, are one package. The coilover unit is bolted top and bottom, at the top of the coilover to the frame, and at the bottom of the coilover to the lower A arm in front and the axle housing in the rear. Hope this is some of the info you were looking for.
Thanks for this really helpful. Do we know the type of shocks and springs Sasquatch vs non-squatch?
 

dgorsett

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I believe the consensus is because it's heaver since it comes standard with more armor.
Right, although the PN's are for different shocks not springs, but probably right.
 

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Thanks for this really helpful. Do we know the type of shocks and springs Sasquatch vs non-squatch?
Not real sure what you're question is. The Bronco has coil over shocks on all four corners, meaning the coil spring is not mounted to the frame or axle or A arms anywhere, the coil is mounted directly to the shock. The springs are coils, with various slight differences in spring rate and length based on the model and options. The shocks are a nitrogen charged monotube shock. The Sasquatch and Badlands shocks are a special position sensitive shock made by Bilstein. There are videos out there (I think in an above post) that explain how the shock works. Basically, the valving increases as the shock shaft moves towards full compression or full extension. There are three valving zones, softer in the middle to make it more comfortable at ride height and small bumps, then firmer as the shaft compresses to better handle bigger bumps, and firmer as the shaft extends to provide better suspension control when hitting much bigger bumps.

For comparison, all high performance desert cars use what are called bypass shocks. They are position sensitive using separate tubes on the outside of the shock body with check valves to control the valving at different positions of shock compression or extension. Basic bypasses have three zones, and they go up from there to 5 or 6 zones. The SaS and Badlands have a version of 3 zone internal bypass shocks, which is really pretty trick.
 
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Not real sure what you're question is. The Bronco has coil over shocks on all four corners, meaning the coil spring is not mounted to the frame or axle or A arms anywhere, the coil is mounted directly to the shock. The springs are coils, with various slight differences in spring rate and length based on the model and options. The shocks are a nitrogen charged monotube shock. The Sasquatch and Badlands shocks are a special position sensitive shock made by Bilstein. There are videos out there (I think in an above post) that explain how the shock works. Basically, the valving increases as the shock shaft moves towards full compression or full extension. There are three valving zones, softer in the middle to make it more comfortable at ride height and small bumps, then firmer as the shaft compresses to better handle bigger bumps, and firmer as the shaft extends to provide better suspension control when hitting much bigger bumps.

For comparison, all high performance desert cars use what are called bypass shocks. They are position sensitive using separate tubes on the outside of the shock body with check valves to control the valving at different positions of shock compression or extension. Basic bypasses have three zones, and they go up from there to 5 or 6 zones. The SaS and Badlands have a version of 3 zone internal bypass shocks, which is really pretty trick.
Helpful. Very technical but helpful

From I guess a subjective real world standpoint I wonder how stock Bronco compares to stock jeep wrangler
 

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Not real sure what you're question is. The Bronco has coil over shocks on all four corners, meaning the coil spring is not mounted to the frame or axle or A arms anywhere, the coil is mounted directly to the shock. The springs are coils, with various slight differences in spring rate and length based on the model and options. The shocks are a nitrogen charged monotube shock. The Sasquatch and Badlands shocks are a special position sensitive shock made by Bilstein. There are videos out there (I think in an above post) that explain how the shock works. Basically, the valving increases as the shock shaft moves towards full compression or full extension. There are three valving zones, softer in the middle to make it more comfortable at ride height and small bumps, then firmer as the shaft compresses to better handle bigger bumps, and firmer as the shaft extends to provide better suspension control when hitting much bigger bumps.

For comparison, all high performance desert cars use what are called bypass shocks. They are position sensitive using separate tubes on the outside of the shock body with check valves to control the valving at different positions of shock compression or extension. Basic bypasses have three zones, and they go up from there to 5 or 6 zones. The SaS and Badlands have a version of 3 zone internal bypass shocks, which is really pretty trick.
Thanks
 
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