Pics of 2.3L engine & underhood compartment in 2021 Bronco

Hoofnmouth

Base
Well-Known Member
First Name
mark
Joined
Jul 10, 2020
Messages
278
Reaction score
448
Location
N ca
Vehicle(s)
ford focus st
Clubs
 
I've been test driving electric cars for the last few years, and we are really close to the affordability point and technological point where it makes sense to buy one on its own merits. For me, we are not quite there yet, but close. I will say this, to me, an electric car still counts as a manual transmission: it's just a 1-speed manual that you can't stall :ROFLMAO:.

Seriously though, the main reason I drive a stick shift on every car I currently own, and do my best to only purchase manual transmission vehicles, is a serious aversion to all the driving dynamics and fun factor downsides of either an automatic or a CVT. An electric car skirts the issue entirely by just never needing to shift! In all the electric cars I've driven (several), never once have I reached for the non-existent shifter with the feeling that I needed to correct something the machine was doing. On the other hand, that sensation happens regularly in every automatic or CVT internal-combustion vehicle I've ever driven.

So in short, I'll welcome the electric revolution once we can get earth moving torque, low center of gravity, great driving dynamics and reasonable range for just small upcharge over an equivalent ICE vehicle. Your 10-15 year estimate is probably right on the money for when that will be reality.
Not me im fighting it evey step of the way like the metric system,with that said ive got my reserve on the cybertruck lol.





Advertisement

 

Mountain Goat

Black Diamond
Well-Known Member
First Name
Tyler
Joined
Jul 26, 2020
Messages
150
Reaction score
275
Location
Virginia
Vehicle(s)
'01 BMW 325i, '17 VW Alltrack, '20 Nissan Versa
Not me im fighting it evey step of the way like the metric system,with that said ive got my reserve on the cybertruck lol.
I drive a lot in DC traffic. They are so darn peaceful to drive, and they make excellent commuters. It's just not quite mature enough tech to warrant the price IMO, but I do want one once I can make it check out for my own use case. Regardless, I don't see a day where I don't have at least one gas or oil burner in my fleet anytime soon. There is still something to be said for the ol' burble burble pop pop soundtrack.
 

Broncomputer

Black Diamond
Well-Known Member
First Name
Chris
Joined
Sep 9, 2020
Messages
81
Reaction score
105
Location
Los Angeles
Vehicle(s)
GTI
I've been test driving electric cars for the last few years, and we are really close to the affordability point and technological point where it makes sense to buy one on its own merits. For me, we are not quite there yet, but close. I will say this, to me, an electric car still counts as a manual transmission: it's just a 1-speed manual that you can't stall :ROFLMAO:.

Seriously though, the main reason I drive a stick shift on every car I currently own, and do my best to only purchase manual transmission vehicles, is a serious aversion to all the driving dynamics and fun factor downsides of either an automatic or a CVT. An electric car skirts the issue entirely by just never needing to shift! In all the electric cars I've driven (several), never once have I reached for the non-existent shifter with the feeling that I needed to correct something the machine was doing. On the other hand, that sensation happens regularly in every automatic or CVT internal-combustion vehicle I've ever driven.

So in short, I'll welcome the electric revolution once we can get earth moving torque, low center of gravity, great driving dynamics and reasonable range for just small upcharge over an equivalent ICE vehicle. Your 10-15 year estimate is probably right on the money for when that will be reality.

Yeah we have a 2012 Prius and it has been great. In addition to the Bronco reservation I have one for the Mach-E. I think Ford is going to knock it out of the park with both vehicles.

However I don't think I'm quite ready to give up shifting yet and I need the space, plus the Bronco is just...cool, and in someways has more tech than the Mach-E. So I'll probably end up cancelling my order for the Mach-E.

It's too bad my wife doesn't like the Mach-E; I really want her to get an electric because she drives WAY more than me, so we're looking at a Model Y or Volvo XC40 Recharge.

But I do think, depending on how well the Mach-E does, and once we get into sub 30k EVs that we'll see a lot more out and about. Depending on your state and Federal administrations, it may even be sooner.

I really can't wait for a Rivian powered Bronco, that can get 500 miles a charge, that can charge in 10 minutes, can do a tank turn...but that's a ways away for sure.
 

Xodric

Badlands
Well-Known Member
First Name
Daniel
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Messages
434
Reaction score
1,130
Location
Manitoba, Canada ( Born/Raised in Kansas )
Vehicle(s)
1978 Bronco XLT, 1979 F150 4x4
Clubs
 
I swore in the video that was posted by the Overlanding guy on Youtube that they didn't want him showing the engine bay in the video because it wasn't production level.

Edit:

Skip to 10:07 and he states that he was told "dont open the hood because some things might change under there"

 
Last edited:

BHerring96

Badlands
New Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
2
Location
San Antonio
Vehicle(s)
96 Bronco, 04 Duramax
I totally disagree with this. The 2.3 is a potent engine for its size. Its actually pretty impressive. And with the 93 Octane tune you get around 325hp and 375tq. That much power from a small in-line 4 is pretty amazing. A lot of past V8s didn't even get that. Too many people are still obsessed with counting cylinders.
Honest question for anyone. Will the 2.3 be able to handle long term wear and tear in a heavy off road truck compared to the 2.7. I just feel like a turbo i4 hauling large tires and being beat up offroad is comparable to a child on steroids lifting heavy weights. The kids gonna break a bone at some point. or am I wrong?
 

BroncoMan13

Base
Well-Known Member
First Name
Jason
Joined
Jul 19, 2020
Messages
602
Reaction score
1,081
Location
Pennsylvania
Vehicle(s)
2018 Harley Davidson RKS
Honest question for anyone. Will the 2.3 be able to handle long term wear and tear in a heavy off road truck compared to the 2.7. I just feel like a turbo i4 hauling large tires and being beat up offroad is comparable to a child on steroids lifting heavy weights. The kids gonna break a bone at some point. or am I wrong?
Plenty of people boost the hell out of it and Drag race it in the Mustang. And it holds up. That's way more strenuous then chugging along a dirt road on 35s.
 

Itchysquatch

Badlands
Active Member
First Name
Luke
Joined
Aug 20, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
43
Location
Vermont
Vehicle(s)
99 4runner, 2014 E class
Honest question for anyone. Will the 2.3 be able to handle long term wear and tear in a heavy off road truck compared to the 2.7. I just feel like a turbo i4 hauling large tires and being beat up offroad is comparable to a child on steroids lifting heavy weights. The kids gonna break a bone at some point. or am I wrong?

Ask that question to Toyota truck owners. Turbo 4 cylinder was in the Toyota truck that top gear tried to destroy and couldn’t. With the right gearing a turbo 4 will be just fine.
 

N3T

Big Bend
Well-Known Member
First Name
Ed
Joined
Aug 30, 2020
Messages
92
Reaction score
202
Location
Detroit
Vehicle(s)
95 e320 wagon
Pics of the 2.3L engine compartment.

2021-bronco-2-3l-engine-compartment-1-jpg.jpg



2021-bronco-2-3l-engine-compartment-2-jpg.jpg



2021-bronco-2-3l-engine-compartment-3-jpg.jpg



2021-bronco-2-3l-engine-compartment-4-jpg.jpg



2021-bronco-2-3l-engine-compartment-5-jpg.jpg



2021-bronco-2-3l-engine-compartment-6-jpg.jpg
Happy to see so much of the wiring so high in the engine bay. Hopefully alternator isn’t low? Would be a nice bonus.
 

Bmadda

Badlands
Well-Known Member
First Name
Brian
Joined
Jul 18, 2020
Messages
367
Reaction score
569
Location
Wisconsin USA
Vehicle(s)
1990 Bronco eddie bauer
Vehicle Showcase
1
Honest question for anyone. Will the 2.3 be able to handle long term wear and tear in a heavy off road truck compared to the 2.7. I just feel like a turbo i4 hauling large tires and being beat up offroad is comparable to a child on steroids lifting heavy weights. The kids gonna break a bone at some point. or am I wrong?
U just are caught up in the way engine choices are marketed to the american public...the 4cyl is always considered "disposable". A 4cyl vehicle is a "throwaway". Truth is nobody here knows which will hold up better long term. Wouldn't suprise me if the 2.3 outlasts the 2.7, but I could see it going the other way as well. Historically for me my luck has been better w/inline engines in offroad vehicles. An I6 would be cool, but we are not going back down that road apparently. I4 is a motor that faces tons of prejudice from the consumer...but Ford's I4's have historically been very good...going back many many years. v6? well you guys tell me?
 

rapidredbronco2021

Outer Banks
Well-Known Member
First Name
Jack
Joined
Aug 8, 2020
Messages
301
Reaction score
284
Location
Westchester, New York
Vehicle(s)
DD 2019 Ford Escape

Broncomputer

Black Diamond
Well-Known Member
First Name
Chris
Joined
Sep 9, 2020
Messages
81
Reaction score
105
Location
Los Angeles
Vehicle(s)
GTI

Advertisement




 



Advertisement
Top