Sasquatch Suspension Limiter

Comadivine11

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I couldn't find if somebody has already answered this but, if I understand correctly, the sasquatch suspension comes with limiters preventing full upward travel of shocks to keep tires from hitting the tire wells. Does anybody know what the limiter actually is? Is it just a longer bump stop? If so, would it be somewhat easily removed?

The reason I'm wondering is say I end up going with the Black Diamond w/ sasquatch mostly for the lockers and better shocks etc, but I wanted to put 33s on it, could I remove the bumpers and regain full articulation?
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kodiakisland

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That's been questioned in many threads. So far no one seems to know. I'd like to know if the same UCAs are used in both suspensions as well.

If whatever limits travel in the squatch can be removed, it would be a great platform for 33s. If it can't, spending money to limit travel is not the best use of my money.
 

da_jokker

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I'm not an experienced Off roader.. hell I don't know if I can even qualify to be one at all right now, but how important is Travel vs traction? I mean, watching those bronco's going through Rubicon and Moab with wheels in the air but them still doing it... that's good enough for anything I'd ever think of doing with my brand new $50k+ vehicle :)
 

Spooled

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I'm not an experienced Off roader.. hell I don't know if I can even qualify to be one at all right now, but how important is Travel vs traction? I mean, watching those bronco's going through Rubicon and Moab with wheels in the air but them still doing it... that's good enough for anything I'd ever think of doing with my brand new $50k+ vehicle :)
The more extreme the articulation, the more travel you need to keep as many wheels on the ground as possible. Once you start hanging tires off the ground that's when you need lockers to pull you through.
 

Clark

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Limiting up travel is no big deal. It is much more important to have “droop” in your suspension so when the rig enters off camber situations, the tires remain on the ground.

Up travel is till important, don’t get me wrong. But if they are only limiting the amount a tire can stuff up into a wheel well and not the amount a tire drops away from the wheel well (droop), then no one needs to be concerned with getting the Sas pack.
 

da_jokker

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Having a jeep now with open Diffs, as soon as I heard SAS gets you the lockers + front I was in.. then I heard you get the stronger front axle and I doubled down... Now if the WT (just because it comes with the 2.7 + SAS) gets crap MPG... we'll see.
 

elfshadow

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It has admittedly been a while since I've wheeled seriously - but I really liked being able to articulate well and keep tires on the ground in my AZ rock crawling days. I could get through a lot of places with only 31's and a 2.5" lift. 33's and a 4" lift on a YJ would have been nice of course.

But I'm really thinking this Bronco with lockers, 33's, and articulation will do it for me.
 

Bayou_Bronco

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Generally it would be limited with a longer bump stop. Anything that else that would be a hard stop would be jarring to the suspension and likely cause failures. Unless there is something that I'm not thinking of.
 

Clark

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Generally it would be limited with a longer bump stop. Anything that else that would be a hard stop would be jarring to the suspension and likely cause failures. Unless there is something that I'm not thinking of.
You’re correct. If they did otherwise they’d bottom out shocks and stack springs which would ruin both and be very jarring.
 

ZackDanger

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Limiting up travel is no big deal. It is much more important to have “droop” in your suspension so when the rig enters off camber situations, the tires remain on the ground.

Up travel is till important, don’t get me wrong. But if they are only limiting the amount a tire can stuff up into a wheel well and not the amount a tire drops away from the wheel well (droop), then no one needs to be concerned with getting the Sas pack.
All this makes sense for the IFS. But considering the rear is a solid axle, wouldn’t limiting up travel also limit droop?
 

Bayou_Bronco

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All this makes sense for the IFS. But considering the rear is a solid axle, wouldn’t limiting up travel also limit droop?
Not really. The rear droop is limited by the extension of the shocks mostly. Longer shocks would allow more droop, assuming the articulation of the 5 link allows it without binding up.
 

ZackDanger

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Not really. The rear droop is limited by the extension of the shocks mostly. Longer shocks would allow more droop, assuming the articulation of the 5 link allows it without binding up.
Ah. That makes sense. Thanks!
 

Clark

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All this makes sense for the IFS. But considering the rear is a solid axle, wouldn’t limiting up travel also limit droop?
Yes and no.

Depends on a lot of factors. Like the joints that connect your suspension to your axle and your axle to your frame/body. Rigs with tons of articulation use rod joints (heim, Johnny, or other joints) that allow the axle to move with less binding than standard pivot joints/bushings allow. Coilovers allow for this as well.

Coil springs compress and unload in an arc under the rig when the axle is articulating. This, combined with joints that allow for more freedom of movement, allows one side of the axle to still articulate, even if the other side is maxed out due to limited travel. Stock bushings in the control arms of Broncos allow for this as well, but they wear out more quickly and don’t offer as much freedom of movement as aftermarket joints.

There is WAY more to it than that, but it’s a can of worms. FWIW, a great ratio for a strictly rock crawling rig is 20% up, 80% down for travel. Baja would be 50% up and 50% down. Daily driver would be somewhere in between, leaning toward droop over up travel.
 
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