Sasquatch Suspension Travel

Gamecock

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Where did you find the number for the Sasquatch wheel travel?
Multiple Ford reps have said that Sasquatch wheel up-travel is 10mm less than Badlands....so you can calculate it. Very little difference in effect.
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MoabRox

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Multiple Ford reps have said that Sasquatch wheel up-travel is 10mm less than Badlands....so you can calculate it. Very little difference in effect.
That's great news and I appreciate the response. Basesquatch is making a lot of sense for me right now. Thanks.
 

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I’m green when it comes to off-roading so forgive me if this is completely off base. But watching videos online of the bronco squatched and non squatched doing some of the things they’re doing like in Moab and other places, it seems to me like this vehicle will do just about anything you need it to from the factory. My question is, what more could you possibly want to do? Is it more of extreme rock crawling with huge tires? Or running whoops at high speeds like the Baja version? I’m trying to figure out what else you would need more articulation and wheel travel for. Or basically why it concerns you? Wondering if it should concern me. Like I said, new to this, so don’t judge too harshly.
 

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Where did you find the number for the Sasquatch wheel travel?
I can't recall who told the number in inches, but I jotted it down at the time. I think it was a Ford Marketing rep on a Q&A live stream for Bronco Nation.

Here's the Q&A from SEMA queued to the part where he talks about the lift and suspension.
 

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Does anyone have a solid, factual answer as to how & where "suspension travel" is measured? Is it at the tire centerline, the lower ball joint, or ?? Is it from full extension (tire off the ground) to full compression (component hitting the bump stops)?
 
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MoabRox

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I’m green when it comes to off-roading so forgive me if this is completely off base. But watching videos online of the bronco squatched and non squatched doing some of the things they’re doing like in Moab and other places, it seems to me like this vehicle will do just about anything you need it to from the factory. My question is, what more could you possibly want to do? Is it more of extreme rock crawling with huge tires? Or running whoops at high speeds like the Baja version? I’m trying to figure out what else you would need more articulation and wheel travel for. Or basically why it concerns you? Wondering if it should concern me. Like I said, new to this, so don’t judge too harshly.
Great questions and there is no shame in being a novice (we all were at one time or another).

I'm not sure which Bronco videos you are referring to. I've seen a few and one that represents most of the wheeling we do is this one (please forgive me that it's from BN).


I've driven many, if not all, of the trails in this video with both a IFS 1989 4Runner and later with my 1998 Cherokee. My old 4Runner had horrible front wheel travel (right around 6" if I remember correctly) and until I installed a rear locker was pretty limited. After I installed a locker in the rear and a TrueTrac in the front, it could do everything in the referenced video but often lifting a front or rear tire (32") at least a few feet off the ground. By comparison, I've driven the same trails with my Cherokee with open differentials (no lockers or limited slips) and 31" tires. With the sway bar disconnected, I seldom lifted a tire and when I did, it was usually a few inches or a foot or so. Since then, I've increased the lift, locked the rear, installed lower gears and run 33" MTs. It easily tackles trails like those in the video hardly ever lifting a tire and loosing traction. Why does that matter?

My experience is that broken axles, blown u-joints and cv-joints, etc. usually occur with a locked axle and when a tire is either in the air or spinning in the loose dirt or mud (or worse, the vehicle is hopping). In those situations, a locker directs almost all of the power to the wheel with traction (as it is designed to do). Big tires + an overloaded rig may just exceed what an axle or joint can handle. Also, the more wheel travel (articulation) you have, the more tires you keep on the ground, which means you have more traction (with or without locked axles). That means two things to me. I have better control of what my rig is doing, preventing broken parts and body damage, and it enables me to safely (both for the vehicle and occupants) tackle more challenging trails. There are practical benefits too. Tires on the ground/rocks mean fewer and less violent body sways, increasing the comfort of the occupants. I can't count how many times a passenger has hit their head on the side window when we suddenly (and unexpectedly to them) came back to earth. The scariest moments I've had wheeling are when I had one or two tires off the ground, and that simply isn't fun for my wife.

Does any of this worry me with the Bronco? Nope. Even the base suspension has way more wheel travel than my old 4Runner did and I expect mine will easily tackle 90% of our off-roading. I'm also really looking forward to the smoother ride the IFS will give when I'm blazing down back country roads.

I'm bouncing back and forth between a Basesquatch and a Black Diamond build. The 2-door Bronco has pretty much the same wheelbase as my Cherokee, although it will be wider and heavier. I expect that even with only the base suspension, a rear locker and 33" tires, it will be similarly capable. Dang I just talked myself back into a Black Diamond (with 33" Nitto Ridge Grapplers or the BL 33" Territory MTs)!

I hope this at least starts to answer your questions.
 

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Great questions and there is no shame in being a novice (we all were at one time or another).

I'm not sure which Bronco videos you are referring to. I've seen a few and one that represents most of the wheeling we do is this one (please forgive me that it's from BN).


I've driven many, if not all, of the trails in this video with both a IFS 1989 4Runner and later with my 1998 Cherokee. My old 4Runner had horrible front wheel travel (right around 6" if I remember correctly) and until I installed a rear locker was pretty limited. After I installed a locker in the rear and a TrueTrac in the front, it could do everything in the referenced video but often lifting a front or rear tire (32") at least a few feet off the ground. By comparison, I've driven the same trails with my Cherokee with open differentials (no lockers or limited slips) and 31" tires. With the sway bar disconnected, I seldom lifted a tire and when I did, it was usually a few inches or a foot or so. Since then, I've increased the lift, locked the rear, installed lower gears and run 33" MTs. It easily tackles trails like those in the video hardly ever lifting a tire and loosing traction. Why does that matter?

My experience is that broken axles, blown u-joints and cv-joints, etc. usually occur with a locked axle and when a tire is either in the air or spinning in the loose dirt or mud (or worse, the vehicle is hopping). In those situations, a locker directs almost all of the power to the wheel with traction (as it is designed to do). Big tires + an overloaded rig may just exceed what an axle or joint can handle. Also, the more wheel travel (articulation) you have, the more tires you keep on the ground, which means you have more traction (with or without locked axles). That means two things to me. I have better control of what my rig is doing, preventing broken parts and body damage, and it enables me to safely (both for the vehicle and occupants) tackle more challenging trails. There are practical benefits too. Tires on the ground/rocks mean fewer and less violent body sways, increasing the comfort of the occupants. I can't count how many times a passenger has hit their head on the side window when we suddenly (and unexpectedly to them) came back to earth. The scariest moments I've had wheeling are when I had one or two tires off the ground, and that simply isn't fun for my wife.

Does any of this worry me with the Bronco? Nope. Even the base suspension has way more wheel travel than my old 4Runner did and I expect mine will easily tackle 90% of our off-roading. I'm also really looking forward to the smoother ride the IFS will give when I'm blazing down back country roads.

I'm bouncing back and forth between a Basesquatch and a Black Diamond build. The 2-door Bronco has pretty much the same wheelbase as my Cherokee, although it will be wider and heavier. I expect that even with only the base suspension, a rear locker and 33" tires, it will be similarly capable. Dang I just talked myself back into a Black Diamond (with 33" Nitto Ridge Grapplers or the BL 33" Territory MTs)!

I hope this at least starts to answer your questions.
Thanks for the response. It answered all of my questions. Myself, I’m going with the Wildtrak and that will definitely be more and do more than I will ever need. But it’ll be nice to be able to do almost anything if the need ever arises. I too am concerned with safety and comfort. This bronco will be my wife’s daily driver and I’d like her to want to go out on trails with me and not be scared out of her mind.
 

BigMike949

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Answer: Less than Badlands
Why doesn't anyone know: Ford isn't communicating this because it's less than the Rubicon and they don't want real data public. This is one of the big reasons I'm going Badlands 33s and not Squatch.
I was planning on going badlands sasquatch, that would be a solid reason to not due the sasquatch package, and do my own suspension, tires and wheels. I wonder how long it will take to get some lift options out to market on these.
 

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Great questions and there is no shame in being a novice (we all were at one time or another).

I'm not sure which Bronco videos you are referring to. I've seen a few and one that represents most of the wheeling we do is this one (please forgive me that it's from BN).


I've driven many, if not all, of the trails in this video with both a IFS 1989 4Runner and later with my 1998 Cherokee. My old 4Runner had horrible front wheel travel (right around 6" if I remember correctly) and until I installed a rear locker was pretty limited. After I installed a locker in the rear and a TrueTrac in the front, it could do everything in the referenced video but often lifting a front or rear tire (32") at least a few feet off the ground. By comparison, I've driven the same trails with my Cherokee with open differentials (no lockers or limited slips) and 31" tires. With the sway bar disconnected, I seldom lifted a tire and when I did, it was usually a few inches or a foot or so. Since then, I've increased the lift, locked the rear, installed lower gears and run 33" MTs. It easily tackles trails like those in the video hardly ever lifting a tire and loosing traction. Why does that matter?

My experience is that broken axles, blown u-joints and cv-joints, etc. usually occur with a locked axle and when a tire is either in the air or spinning in the loose dirt or mud (or worse, the vehicle is hopping). In those situations, a locker directs almost all of the power to the wheel with traction (as it is designed to do). Big tires + an overloaded rig may just exceed what an axle or joint can handle. Also, the more wheel travel (articulation) you have, the more tires you keep on the ground, which means you have more traction (with or without locked axles). That means two things to me. I have better control of what my rig is doing, preventing broken parts and body damage, and it enables me to safely (both for the vehicle and occupants) tackle more challenging trails. There are practical benefits too. Tires on the ground/rocks mean fewer and less violent body sways, increasing the comfort of the occupants. I can't count how many times a passenger has hit their head on the side window when we suddenly (and unexpectedly to them) came back to earth. The scariest moments I've had wheeling are when I had one or two tires off the ground, and that simply isn't fun for my wife.

Does any of this worry me with the Bronco? Nope. Even the base suspension has way more wheel travel than my old 4Runner did and I expect mine will easily tackle 90% of our off-roading. I'm also really looking forward to the smoother ride the IFS will give when I'm blazing down back country roads.

I'm bouncing back and forth between a Basesquatch and a Black Diamond build. The 2-door Bronco has pretty much the same wheelbase as my Cherokee, although it will be wider and heavier. I expect that even with only the base suspension, a rear locker and 33" tires, it will be similarly capable. Dang I just talked myself back into a Black Diamond (with 33" Nitto Ridge Grapplers or the BL 33" Territory MTs)!

I hope this at least starts to answer your questions.
Really good explanation, many should read this! I would go with the BD for sure if I could get the HD front axle. I think the standard axle will be fine, but it is the limiting factor durability wise. I know that 33" (285/70/17) will likely be the long term tire for me. Ford seems to be intentionally limiting tire size to the 265/70/17 size (BD and Ranger Tremor). Assume they see durability limits with larger tires (I think I could make it last, I don't generally beat on my stuff, but.....).
 

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1610657940965.png


So these are maximum articulation number for each wheel of a JEEP WRANGLER RUBICON with the sway bar disconnected. And then what you achieve with some of the top after market .. they used a totally different method of measuring travel so ignore 25" vs 10", (i actually sourced a really good article that confirm the badlands will have more travel without adding the sasquatch It’s Bronco vs. Wrangler in a Bench Racing Battle (autoweek.com),) and that the travel on the bronco with out sas is 90% of what the stock rubicon travel is one of the few places ford didn't top jeep. But i am sharing this graphic, because you can see what a difference the aftermarket guys were able to make. a 20-25% increase over stock articulation is achievable with aftermarket suspension.. so might be smart to forgoes the sas.. and pay out of pocket for wheels, tires, and a lift. will probably run you 6k.. so if cash is an issue sas is pretty good way to get it done and be fully under ford warranty, but if performance is key to you.. this is something to think about. Also the SAS uses a very high end coil-over Bilstein shock system, that if you want to go fast in the dirt is really nice, will cost you more like 10k to replicate aftermarket.
 

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Multiple Ford reps have said that Sasquatch wheel up-travel is 10mm less than Badlands....so you can calculate it. Very little difference in effect.
Exactly. That 3/8ths of an inch is not going to make any real world difference
 
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MoabRox

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So these are maximum articulation number for each wheel of a JEEP WRANGLER RUBICON with the sway bar disconnected. And then what you achieve with some of the top after market .. they used a totally different method of measuring travel so ignore 25" vs 10", (i actually sourced a really good article that confirm the badlands will have more travel without adding the sasquatch It’s Bronco vs. Wrangler in a Bench Racing Battle (autoweek.com),) and that the travel on the bronco with out sas is 90% of what the stock rubicon travel is one of the few places ford didn't top jeep. But i am sharing this graphic, because you can see what a difference the aftermarket guys were able to make. a 20-25% increase over stock articulation is achievable with aftermarket suspension.. so might be smart to forgoes the sas.. and pay out of pocket for wheels, tires, and a lift. will probably run you 6k.. so if cash is an issue sas is pretty good way to get it done and be fully under ford warranty, but if performance is key to you.. this is something to think about. Also the SAS uses a very high end coil-over Bilstein shock system, that if you want to go fast in the dirt is really nice, will cost you more like 10k to replicate aftermarket.
Great information and provides much to think about. Fords preliminary tech specs list the BL suspension as having 9.4" in the front and 10.3" in the rear, compared to 7.9"/8.5" for the base suspension (Base, BB, BD and OB models from what I can tell), but I'm trying to stay well under $45K (including sales tax). I wish we knew the details (cost and specs) for the FPP Off-Road Suspension kit listed with the accessories. The question I need to answer in the next couple months is for darn near the same money, do I go with the BaseSquatch (knowing I'll most likely downsize the tires) or go with the BD, with less suspension travel and a weaker front axle, but with the washout floors that I really want.
 

BigMike949

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Great information and provides much to think about. Fords preliminary tech specs list the BL suspension as having 9.4" in the front and 10.3" in the rear, compared to 7.9"/8.5" for the base suspension (Base, BB, BD and OB models from what I can tell), but I'm trying to stay well under $45K (including sales tax). I wish we knew the details (cost and specs) for the FPP Off-Road Suspension kit listed with the accessories. The question I need to answer in the next couple months is for darn near the same money, do I go with the BaseSquatch (knowing I'll most likely downsize the tires) or go with the BD, with less suspension travel and a weaker front axle, but with the washout floors that I really want.
ya its a bit to think about, cost wise amortizing the sasquatch into the loan, and really getting a discount by not paying for the stock parts and ripping them out.. is a cost savings.. it will be plenty capable for rock crawling, and able to handle the most difficult trails. I am not sure I am for spending the extra cash, waiting for the aftermarket to develop products, and then once you lift you find you have to change various other parts, like track bars, etc and that will be a pain. Also i live in southern california.. so a great majority of my off-roading is dessert.. which the bronco badlands sasquatch is really built for.. I will most likely go for, and save all the fun and expense of a custom build. I like the rims, and I so so on the tires, maybe i pull those first week and selll them, and get some Ko2 or Cooper STT pros
 

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Hmmm, looking at the numbers listed above and then looking at what the King shock has for travel.....

https://www.polyperformance.com/king-2021-ford-bronco-2-5-shock-set

I'd now like to know what the shock travel is for the various trim levels , OR what the Kings give for travel at the tires, assuming that is what Ford measured.

Surely the $3000 King set will be better than my baseBase.

What about the Ford Performance Fox set, (which I'd prefer to stay away from)?
 
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