Rubisquatch

Wildtrak
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The tread on the tires must have fooled me. Those look like the “max traction” tires that come with the Sasquatch
You are correct that the tires are the Goodyear MTs but the ones on this Bronco in the video are the 285/70 size (33”) whereas the Sasquatch version is the same tire but in a 315/70 (35”) Size. The giveaway though is these are not the wheels/rims That come with Sasquatch nor does this rig have the wider flares (so those are 2 ways to tell if Sas or not).
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t3n2and4

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Jon the flannel guy is from here. Nashville Early Bronco
Some of the other guys have beautiful 1st generation riggs but go ahead and keep talking about stuff you have no idea about.
Looking at his other videos - corporate probably mandates long sleeves to cover his ink for Ford cooperative content.
 

Ksjrb03

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Lol, ya there’s zero chance I’ll ever do that.
 

t3n2and4

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Why in the world would they have a square nut instead of a round nut? I have a wrangler and the doors are annoying as hell to line up as it is, adding the fact that you have to get it at the perfect angle as well is almost cruel.
I’d have to examine it but probably so the flat areas can transfer load in certain conditions. Fully round has a point of transfer but a flat surface you can safely assume the whole area shares the impact. Will make the structure more reliable even when built to a ‘loose’ tolerance.
 

FishKzor

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Highlight: learning how a plug works.
 

Broncomputer

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Gaaah. Upgraded 33's looking hella good. Extremely good, the best I've seen them look on the BL.
Think I will stick with Squatch bc f#ck it. Don't want to regret not having the more aggressive stance.
yeah they look really good. I like the stock wheels, I just wish they were dark.
 

rpetersen29

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I’d have to examine it but probably so the flat areas can transfer load in certain conditions. Fully round has a point of transfer but a flat surface you can safely assume the whole area shares the impact. Will make the structure more reliable even when built to a ‘loose’ tolerance.
Not gonna say you're wrong here but that doesn't make much sense. If you're designing a vehicle to work with the doors off you don't want a critical force bearing point to be located in a part that could be removed. And even if it's not critical, I've never heard of the round nut being a major issue with wranglers.
 

texasgreazer

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Why in the world would they have a square nut instead of a round nut? I have a wrangler and the doors are annoying as hell to line up as it is, adding the fact that you have to get it at the perfect angle as well is almost cruel.
I’d have to examine it but probably so the flat areas can transfer load in certain conditions. Fully round has a point of transfer but a flat surface you can safely assume the whole area shares the impact. Will make the structure more reliable even when built to a ‘loose’ tolerance.
I'm thinking it may also have a torsion spring in it, somewhat like tailgates with spring-loaded hinges. In position to remove-there's no tension, it loads the spring as it closes. There is no stop-strap, so a spring might make sense to prevent it from freely swinging to full open.
 

rpetersen29

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I'm thinking it may also have a torsion spring in it, somewhat like tailgates with spring-loaded hinges. In position to remove-there's no tension, it loads the spring as it closes. There is no stop-strap, so a spring might make sense to prevent it from freely swinging to full open.
This is probably the reason. Still going to be a pain in the ass lining these things up.
 
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You posted the video. Didn't you watch it?:)
J/K... I posted the video link about 20 minutes before the video premiered. @Administrator thought it would be funny to modify my post to remove the “premieres in 20 minutes” comment... shame on you @Administrator
 

t3n2and4

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I'm thinking it may also have a torsion spring in it, somewhat like tailgates with spring-loaded hinges. In position to remove-there's no tension, it loads the spring as it closes. There is no stop-strap, so a spring might make sense to prevent it from freely swinging to full open.
I think you’re on to something - the wrangler has a strap and these ... don’t. A flat spot to react that spring tension or serve as a hard-stop for the mechanism: This far and no further would make a lot of sense from a design perspective. Get it to 90 to take on/off and have it also be the place where the door swing would have to stop.
@rpetersen29 just wiggle it and jiggle it like the watermelon crawl.
 

corey07

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For garage hanging, why not attach to the wall the same hardware (must be fabricated) that’s on the vehicle. Mount the door on the hardware and swing it “closed” so the door is safely parallel to the wall? Sounds like a nice aftermarket product!
Indeed! Exactly how I want to store mine. Can't wait to get this bronco in my garage and start all the fabrication! Aftermarket will make our heads spin after a couple years haha
 
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Pardon me, but I've always found door storage in the cargo area to be gimmicky if the roof panels can't be stored as well. Will anyone ride with the doors off but the roof is on? I'm not sure about that
I don’t think not being able to take the top off on the road is going to prevent me from taking the doors off... In some instances I’d probably be rolling around with the mess bimini top and feel the desire to take the doors off too...

Also, some onboard storage options include storing the front two roof panels and the front two doors.

Either way, I don’t think having the top on would discourage me.

287CCC32-C44B-42FA-91F2-7B74BE33B483.jpeg
8F37523B-7588-410C-AD21-515A09E00C0B.jpeg



Bimini Top:

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