What is the "Production" Process that begins on March 29th?

KyTruckPlant

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Thanks for the info! I appreciate you taking the time to explain it!

Another question...
What is the typical time duration for a vehicle to go down the assembly line? For example...

Week 1&2 - Chassis and interior assembly (separately)
Week 3&4 - Paint and curing
Week 5 - Assembly of rolling chassis and interior
Week 6 - Final inspection
Week 7-??? - Transport to dealer
Placeholder to answer this when more sorber...





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mds5917

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Thanks for the info! I appreciate you taking the time to explain it!

Another question...
What is the typical time duration for a vehicle to go down the assembly line? For example...

Week 1&2 - Chassis and interior assembly (separately)
Week 3&4 - Paint and curing
Week 5 - Assembly of rolling chassis and interior
Week 6 - Final inspection
Week 7-??? - Transport to dealer
The data from Toyota estimates "that a well appointed car, truck or SUV takes about 17 to 18 hours to assemble. Other manufacturers have similar numbers. Some lesser appointed vehicles can be assembled as quickly as 11 hours.

The surprising part is that they are coming off the production floor about one vehicle every 45 to 90 seconds. The largest plants are turning out over 400,000 cars a year."

https://axleaddict.com/auto-industr...y estimate that a well,every 45 to 90 seconds.
 

mds5917

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hotrodtim

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Very interesting manufacturing information given here today, thank you.
 

hotrodtim

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Very interesting manufacturing information given here today, thank you.
 

hotrodtim

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Very interesting manufacturing information given here today, thank you.
 

hotrodtim

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Very interesting manufacturing information given here today, thank you.
 

kimmnen

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Units built after March 29 will not go to the crusher after their time in the sun.
From what I understand, official Job 1 for units to be sold to customers is on May 3rd. Units built in between CAN be sold to retail customers, but will be mannequins for the dealers that can eventually be sold to the public (I may be wrong on that though) , company leases for folks who's job title entitles them to such a nice perk, and other such vehicles than CAN officially be sold.

I don't know a lot about all the scheduling as far as when they start building what, but I do know we receive a broadcast from corporate that gives us the build order. And that system is set up ON a schedule, to broadcast the build schedule. So it all comes down to someone up north flipping the switch, or scheduling the scheduler.

The way the systems are set up now, its takes some effort to build out of the order we are sent. All major components arrive to the assembly line in the order of the build sequence.
For example: a unit with a rotation number of "0453" has been through body construction and paint. First thing that's done is the doors are removed (easier on Bronco than anything I've seen built!) and sent to a separate line for final assembly. Somewhere on the first line, they find out a welded in nut is missing and the unit has to be pulled off for repair (Most things are repaired as they go down the line, but some require off line repairs).
When that unit is removed from the sequence, we have to notify every final build area that we have a skip. Anything that goes onto the cab has to be pulled aside; the doors, instrument panel, grille, front facia, headlights, tail lights, and whole number of other things. The chassis will go ahead and get built and then put aside to wait for the cab. Opposite if something happens to the chassis. Pull the wheels, bumper, motor, transmission, and set the cab aside. If something happens to the doors, you build the rest and put them aside to be reinserted.

You get the idea, It's a real headache.

And one hiccup in the supply chain, we end up renting out all of the parking lots in the area, build what we can, then park them while they wait for wiper arms, console lids, or what ever it is we are waiting on.

I think that might have been way overdone as a reply, But it pains me to go back and delete it all. When I see/hear complaints about why this or why not that, it makes me chuckle and think "thats not the way world works", at least not here...LOL. Its a welcome change for someone to ask how the sausage is made.
Glad you did not delete.
Miracle workers day after day. Even with major setbacks nothing really fazes them. They do everything they can to get us our vehicles. It is still a rush seeing the units drive off at the end of the line. They make it look easy.
 

KyTruckPlant

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Placeholder to answer this when more sorber...
Ok, I'll try to hammer this out, but less "sorber" and trying to type on a phone with fat fingers.
1st thing that happens is body construction. Our shop runs approximately 29 units an hour and usually has around 200 to 250 units in the shop at any given moment. So, let's estimate
Thanks for the info! I appreciate you taking the time to explain it!

Another question...
What is the typical time duration for a vehicle to go down the assembly line? For example...

Week 1&2 - Chassis and interior assembly (separately)
Week 3&4 - Paint and curing
Week 5 - Assembly of rolling chassis and interior
Week 6 - Final inspection
Week 7-??? - Transport to dealer

OK, sorber now (lol)

Keep in mind, that each plant is engineered to run at a different rate, as well as having differing conveyor capacities and other factors that will be unique to that facility.

I would say that body construction and painting take a day , and final assembly a day, so 2 days total, maybe more if production isn't scheduled for a full 10 hours per shift.

First thing, The body is constructed. We receive all the body parts individually stamped out, and then weld (rivet, in the case of the F series and the Expy/Nav) each sub-assembly together. Each sub is built up on its own, separate assembly line (doors, tailgate, hood, underbody, bodysides, front structure, etc), and then all brought together and welded(riveted) into a cab. I estimate 12 hours from start to sending it to the paint shop. Here is where my realm of expertise ends.

Paint, I think takes about another 12 hours or so. When we ship the body to the paint shop, it is riding on a pair of metal "skids" along traditional roll beds/tables and conveyors, moving along the floor. Paint dept will hang the skids by chains to an overhead conveyor that, as it rolls along, it travels uphill and downhill through a series of tanks that etch the metal, then electro-coat the metal, rinse with de ionized water. Then, back to the floor conveyors, it is scuffed and primed. Run through an oven to bake the primer, scuffed, then run through the paint booth. Paint is actually "slung" onto the body, not "sprayed" in 2 or 3 coats (its been a while since I've worked in that dept, so I may be behind the times), then clear coat is applied directly onto the wet paint, then it is run through an oven to bake the finish. From here the painted body is sent to a giant "stacker". Bodies are stacked from floor to ceiling in individual "cubbies"(for lack of a better term) probably 10 to 15 high, and 15 or 20 along in a run, and are placed/retrieved by elevator equipped cranes that run along the floor.
1616376295840.png
This, but only painted bodies on skids. One crane has 2 "runs", and we have at least 2, maybe 3 cranes. Based on the build schedule, they pick, and place bodies onto the conveyor in the order of the schedule. Off to final assembly.

I'd say maybe 2 shifts for final assembly, but that certainly ain't the gospel. Around the time the body starts the final assembly phase, the chassis will begin to be built on on a separate line. As I mentioned before, first thing, the doors are removed and sent to be built up. The same doors will ultimately come back to the same body. Now we start installing the wiring harnesses, the modules that are all tucked away behind the interior panels, the interior trim, carpet (rubberized washout for me please), radiator, instrument panel, seats, (in the case of Bronco, the roof), headlights, etc. Meanwhile the chassis is getting all its goodies, starting with the suspension, then the motor/tranny (sent over from being mated up together on a separate line), wheels(from the tire line), bumpers, fuel tank, etc. The body is then set onto the chassis on the final chassis line where assemblers tie the whole thing together, fill the brake system, A/C system, cooling system, electrical tests, fuel, all the little stickers and motor covers.
Then alignment, headlight aim, inspections, water test, window stickers, throw the floor mats in the back and out the door to final delivery.

From here, it could sit in a parking lot for a week, maybe a month if we are waiting on some parts. As far as shipping and delivery, I haven't a clue.


At around 2:10, you'll see the "command center". I'm not the dude looking at the screens, but I'm the guy that develops the screens that displays the data he's looking at. I've also done robot programming, machine programming, and general electrical maintenance. Later on in the video, you'll see the 3D printer that printed my DIY fender badges.

Again, this was probably overdone, but I said I would get back with you.
 

imnewtothis

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Ok, I'll try to hammer this out, but less "sorber" and trying to type on a phone with fat fingers.
1st thing that happens is body construction. Our shop runs approximately 29 units an hour and usually has around 200 to 250 units in the shop at any given moment. So, let's estimate



OK, sorber now (lol)

Keep in mind, that each plant is engineered to run at a different rate, as well as having differing conveyor capacities and other factors that will be unique to that facility.

I would say that body construction and painting take a day , and final assembly a day, so 2 days total, maybe more if production isn't scheduled for a full 10 hours per shift.

First thing, The body is constructed. We receive all the body parts individually stamped out, and then weld (rivet, in the case of the F series and the Expy/Nav) each sub-assembly together. Each sub is built up on its own, separate assembly line (doors, tailgate, hood, underbody, bodysides, front structure, etc), and then all brought together and welded(riveted) into a cab. I estimate 12 hours from start to sending it to the paint shop. Here is where my realm of expertise ends.

Paint, I think takes about another 12 hours or so. When we ship the body to the paint shop, it is riding on a pair of metal "skids" along traditional roll beds/tables and conveyors, moving along the floor. Paint dept will hang the skids by chains to an overhead conveyor that, as it rolls along, it travels uphill and downhill through a series of tanks that etch the metal, then electro-coat the metal, rinse with de ionized water. Then, back to the floor conveyors, it is scuffed and primed. Run through an oven to bake the primer, scuffed, then run through the paint booth. Paint is actually "slung" onto the body, not "sprayed" in 2 or 3 coats (its been a while since I've worked in that dept, so I may be behind the times), then clear coat is applied directly onto the wet paint, then it is run through an oven to bake the finish. From here the painted body is sent to a giant "stacker". Bodies are stacked from floor to ceiling in individual "cubbies"(for lack of a better term) probably 10 to 15 high, and 15 or 20 along in a run, and are placed/retrieved by elevator equipped cranes that run along the floor.
1616376295840.png
This, but only painted bodies on skids. One crane has 2 "runs", and we have at least 2, maybe 3 cranes. Based on the build schedule, they pick, and place bodies onto the conveyor in the order of the schedule. Off to final assembly.

I'd say maybe 2 shifts for final assembly, but that certainly ain't the gospel. Around the time the body starts the final assembly phase, the chassis will begin to be built on on a separate line. As I mentioned before, first thing, the doors are removed and sent to be built up. The same doors will ultimately come back to the same body. Now we start installing the wiring harnesses, the modules that are all tucked away behind the interior panels, the interior trim, carpet (rubberized washout for me please), radiator, instrument panel, seats, (in the case of Bronco, the roof), headlights, etc. Meanwhile the chassis is getting all its goodies, starting with the suspension, then the motor/tranny (sent over from being mated up together on a separate line), wheels(from the tire line), bumpers, fuel tank, etc. The body is then set onto the chassis on the final chassis line where assemblers tie the whole thing together, fill the brake system, A/C system, cooling system, electrical tests, fuel, all the little stickers and motor covers.
Then alignment, headlight aim, inspections, water test, window stickers, throw the floor mats in the back and out the door to final delivery.

From here, it could sit in a parking lot for a week, maybe a month if we are waiting on some parts. As far as shipping and delivery, I haven't a clue.


At around 2:10, you'll see the "command center". I'm not the dude looking at the screens, but I'm the guy that develops the screens that displays the data he's looking at. I've also done robot programming, machine programming, and general electrical maintenance. Later on in the video, you'll see the 3D printer that printed my DIY fender badges.

Again, this was probably overdone, but I said I would get back with you.
I don’t like my steaks overdone. But I’ll take my answers overdone every time.

Thanks for the details brother!!
 

ZackDanger

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Joker

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Ok, I'll try to hammer this out, but less "sorber" and trying to type on a phone with fat fingers.
1st thing that happens is body construction. Our shop runs approximately 29 units an hour and usually has around 200 to 250 units in the shop at any given moment. So, let's estimate



OK, sorber now (lol)

Keep in mind, that each plant is engineered to run at a different rate, as well as having differing conveyor capacities and other factors that will be unique to that facility.

I would say that body construction and painting take a day , and final assembly a day, so 2 days total, maybe more if production isn't scheduled for a full 10 hours per shift.

First thing, The body is constructed. We receive all the body parts individually stamped out, and then weld (rivet, in the case of the F series and the Expy/Nav) each sub-assembly together. Each sub is built up on its own, separate assembly line (doors, tailgate, hood, underbody, bodysides, front structure, etc), and then all brought together and welded(riveted) into a cab. I estimate 12 hours from start to sending it to the paint shop. Here is where my realm of expertise ends.

Paint, I think takes about another 12 hours or so. When we ship the body to the paint shop, it is riding on a pair of metal "skids" along traditional roll beds/tables and conveyors, moving along the floor. Paint dept will hang the skids by chains to an overhead conveyor that, as it rolls along, it travels uphill and downhill through a series of tanks that etch the metal, then electro-coat the metal, rinse with de ionized water. Then, back to the floor conveyors, it is scuffed and primed. Run through an oven to bake the primer, scuffed, then run through the paint booth. Paint is actually "slung" onto the body, not "sprayed" in 2 or 3 coats (its been a while since I've worked in that dept, so I may be behind the times), then clear coat is applied directly onto the wet paint, then it is run through an oven to bake the finish. From here the painted body is sent to a giant "stacker". Bodies are stacked from floor to ceiling in individual "cubbies"(for lack of a better term) probably 10 to 15 high, and 15 or 20 along in a run, and are placed/retrieved by elevator equipped cranes that run along the floor.
1616376295840.png
This, but only painted bodies on skids. One crane has 2 "runs", and we have at least 2, maybe 3 cranes. Based on the build schedule, they pick, and place bodies onto the conveyor in the order of the schedule. Off to final assembly.

I'd say maybe 2 shifts for final assembly, but that certainly ain't the gospel. Around the time the body starts the final assembly phase, the chassis will begin to be built on on a separate line. As I mentioned before, first thing, the doors are removed and sent to be built up. The same doors will ultimately come back to the same body. Now we start installing the wiring harnesses, the modules that are all tucked away behind the interior panels, the interior trim, carpet (rubberized washout for me please), radiator, instrument panel, seats, (in the case of Bronco, the roof), headlights, etc. Meanwhile the chassis is getting all its goodies, starting with the suspension, then the motor/tranny (sent over from being mated up together on a separate line), wheels(from the tire line), bumpers, fuel tank, etc. The body is then set onto the chassis on the final chassis line where assemblers tie the whole thing together, fill the brake system, A/C system, cooling system, electrical tests, fuel, all the little stickers and motor covers.
Then alignment, headlight aim, inspections, water test, window stickers, throw the floor mats in the back and out the door to final delivery.

From here, it could sit in a parking lot for a week, maybe a month if we are waiting on some parts. As far as shipping and delivery, I haven't a clue.


At around 2:10, you'll see the "command center". I'm not the dude looking at the screens, but I'm the guy that develops the screens that displays the data he's looking at. I've also done robot programming, machine programming, and general electrical maintenance. Later on in the video, you'll see the 3D printer that printed my DIY fender badges.

Again, this was probably overdone, but I said I would get back with you.
Awesome read!! Love the attention to details. Much appreciated
 

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