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🚲🚲How Long Does It Take to Charge an Electric Car----No Politics---

King Luis

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i think for sake of the conversation, we should only be discussing production vehicles or ones that are in pre-production. no atlis, no hummer ev, no cybertruck. why? because they either haven't released anything tangible.

i'm interested to know the charge times at home for lets say a 100kwh vehicle. maybe a rivian or similar.
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mybikeisred

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True, not all charge stations offer highest level of charge... And sometimes the ones that do will also not provide full power if other chargers are in use...
I would imagine this is kind of an issue with all the big charging banks. I don't have much EV experience or knowledge, but I have installed residential Tesla chargers. They recommend installing a single charger on an 80 amp circuit, which should fully charge your car in three hours or less, but then a lot of households will go out and get a second EV and want another charger installed. The problem that some people have had is that they add the second charger on another 80 amp circuit. Most homes have a 200 amp service, so now you're using 160 amps of a 200 amp service, so if your wife is drying her hair and you try to microwave a burrito while both cars are charging, your panel can't handle it.

The solution is to install multiple chargers in tandem. You can install up to five of them on a 100amp circuit, but when they run in tandem, the chargers share the power that they're distributing, and the vehicles don't charge as fast. So two vehicles take 4-4.5 hours to fully charge, and that number gets higher with every car you add.

To answer the op, I have never had an ev, but from what I have heard from people who do, If you try to charge it with the 110 adapter on a 15 or 20 amp circuit (regular old electrical outlet), You can charge it all day and never get to 100%. The home Tesla chargers will give you about 80% in an hour, three hours to fully charge. And the super chargers at the mall will fully charge you in about an hour, but a half hour can get you about 80%. Give or take.
 

marjen

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I actually bought a Mach-e as an interim vehicle while I endlessly wait for my bronco. Charging is not a big deal. I installed a 50 amp breaker and connected the supplied,charger. I have the standard battery so a little over 200 miles when fully charged. Usually gets to 90%, which is what I set it to in about 8 hours. Took it on one road trip and got to 80% in 30-35mins.

it’s fantastic around town. Does create more of an issue in going on a road trip. Just need to plan ahead. Otherwise it’s been great. Though I would really like to get my bronco one of thsese days.
 

BrentC

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wow- it seems like for around town use ev's are fine and if it's a hybrid where you can gas it up and get a whole bunch of range that's great but as far as roadtripping a pure ev, at this point it is just too much work/anxiety for me. i can't add 45 mins to my travel time. maybe if the ICE had never been invented we would accept this but given the ease of ICE refueling and the fact that you can carry more fuel onboard, i don't see how people are talking about everything being electric in a few years. seems like we have a ways to go before that
For urban use, short-distance commuting - sure. But if your goal is to be as energy-miserly as possible you’d be better on a bike or on public transit. So the BEV will likely be your 2nd or 3rd vehicle. Once subsidies come off BEVs and a mileage tax gets added, they will be priced too high for the middle-and-lower-income earners. Add to that the spiraling costs of battery metals and the need to replace (and throw away) spent batteries and your BEV resale values will dive as the battery packs wear out.

And we are pretty narrow-minded when thinking of the millions of cars in North America. Search for the number of scooters and motorcycles used in India, Asia and China for an eye-opener. How do you supply metals to that market. Think also of food transport and the need for reefers to do long-haul trucking for perishable goods. Remember these trucks will have to haul the weight of the batteries in addition to the payloads so the payloads will have to be decreased to keep axle loads to road limits. Which way will the price of the transported goods go? And unless the batteries can be swapped out when needed to avoid long recharging stops (more infrastructure and more batteries) how can perishables be delivered on time?

I won’t even get into the notion of electrified military, construction, and agricultural equipment…
 

Neps

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I appreciate you pointing out my wrongness… but could you perhaps offer an answer to the question of how long does it take? You’ve introduced other variables but no range of time to compare to my wrong answer. Am I wrong by minutes? Hours? Really just looking for a general range.
General range of what vehicle using what charge rate?

That was my point, there is no standard answer, and the battery charge rate is relatively uniform (for the purposes of this question). So no you are not charging to 80% capacity then slowing down charge during the last 20%.

With my current EV here is what I see-
Full charge at 120V = 28 to 32 hours
Full charge at 240V 50amp = 4 hours
Full charge at 240V 30amp = 6 to 8 hours

DC fast charge - never found a DC fast charger that was available or working, so I can’t comment.

In my experience, 20 to 50 % of all public chargers are not working. Another 20% are filled by the inconsiderate arse holes who plugins in at 6:00 am and parks at the charger all day when their vehicle can only take 2 hours of charge 🤬

The critical questions have not been asked here.
 

Neps

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I know from a friend’s experience that your last statement is false. He was staying at a VRBO that only had 120VAC 15A outlet available for him to charge his wife’s Tesla in -23C weather. Virtually all the power went to heating the batteries, and very little went to actual charging. He was getting about 1km per hour of charging at the worst of the cold! It took him days to get enough charge to drive back to a rapid charger.

This is very hard on the battery pack as well and will shorten its effective life.
Actually, your friends experience proves my point - albeit second hand knowledge.

The charge voltage and amperage had a greater effect in the cold didn’t it?

Had a 240V outlet at 75 amps been available, he would have had a completely different experience.
If the cold was the determining factor, the available charge rate would have had little effect.
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