Military Spec Bronco Renderings

Andrew_EOD

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Yes, and I always hated that lowest bidder saying...no shit they went with the lowest bidder, that's how capitalism works. It was the lowest bidder that met the specs. No business in their right mind would go with a higher bidder...that's just killing yourself for the competition. And if people actually take a look at what contractors are charging the government...it's laughable
Lowest bidder that SAID they met the specs. Also, a mil spec hammer will be the same as any quality hammer... but will cost A LOT more. Have you not seen military/gov spending? I've been dealing with it a long time now.

Furthermore... it was a joke. LOL





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L8apex

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No business in their right mind would go with a higher bidder...that's just killing yourself for the competition.
Eh not necessarily true. If you are the lowest piece-price bidder, can meet the specs, but have a terrible reputation for delivering parts on time or supply chain issues which then causes a plant to be delayed - I'd be apt to go with a more expensive bidder. Also the expensive bidder may also have a more accurate quote due to greater technical experience. The low bidder may not have included all the testing in the original RFQ, or may not have known what testing was required.

Now, if everything is equal, then yea, go with the lowest bidder.
 

GotGOAT

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I just spent 7 months justifying a procurement that cost a little less than $500,000 so that we didn’t save $50,000 dollars and get a piece of garbage that I would need to replace in 3 years. MIL SPEC is cool and all but you never want to see how the sausage is made. It’s heartbreaking.
 

ZackDanger

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Eh not necessarily true. If you are the lowest piece-price bidder, can meet the specs, but have a terrible reputation for delivering parts on time or supply chain issues which then causes a plant to be delayed - I'd be apt to go with a more expensive bidder. Also the expensive bidder may also have a more accurate quote due to greater technical experience. The low bidder may not have included all the testing in the original RFQ, or may not have known what testing was required.

Now, if everything is equal, then yea, go with the lowest bidder.
In my experience bids can often come in on a bell curve. The extremes should always raise a red flag. On the right are the people hoping you'll over pay, on the left are the people that don't fully understand the nature of the ask, are new to the game and are trying to get their foot in the door, or aren't planning on sticking around long enough to answer for their work.

In the middle are the people that understand the job and are asking a fair price... the spread between them represents differences in efficiency and overhead, gamesmanship to increase profit or repeat business, or other services they offer outside the request parameters (customer support or industry partnerships, typically).

A well written proposal can often work to lop off the ends of the curve, as it leaves you with the professionals that know what they're doing and who know that you know what you're asking for.... only then is it okay to shoot for the lowest bidder... but you have to do your share of the work both before you advertise and while choosing the bid.


Now, what were we talking about?
 

BroncoActual

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Lowest bidder that SAID they met the specs. Also, a mil spec hammer will be the same as any quality hammer... but will cost A LOT more. Have you not seen military/gov spending? I've been dealing with it a long time now.

Furthermore... it was a joke. LOL
Yeah, I know it was a joke, just venting :) And that was the point I was making: that contractors charge a shitload for the same COTS 'thing'

Eh not necessarily true. If you are the lowest piece-price bidder, can meet the specs, but have a terrible reputation for delivering parts on time or supply chain issues which then causes a plant to be delayed - I'd be apt to go with a more expensive bidder. Also the expensive bidder may also have a more accurate quote due to greater technical experience. The low bidder may not have included all the testing in the original RFQ, or may not have known what testing was required.

Now, if everything is equal, then yea, go with the lowest bidder.
Yes, I was generalizing, but you're correct and I agree
 

MadMan4BamaNATL

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Yes, and I always hated that lowest bidder saying...no shit they went with the lowest bidder, that's how capitalism works. It was the lowest bidder that met the specs. No business in their right mind would go with a higher bidder...that's just killing yourself for the competition. And if people actually take a look at what contractors are charging the government...it's laughable
Thank you for preaching some good gospel here. All businesses go with the lowest bidder who meet the requirements of the RFP.

If anyone reads that sentence and doesn't understand it, it usually means you're not a business decision maker. Any procurement expert (I'm sure there are several on Bronco6G) will tell you that's their job. If you buy high, that usually means you get fired and a company can go out of business.

As a consumer, don't you go shopping for the same brand at the place with the lowest possible price? Same concept, so just think.

Again, thank you.
 

MadMan4BamaNATL

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Eh not necessarily true. If you are the lowest piece-price bidder, can meet the specs, but have a terrible reputation for delivering parts on time or supply chain issues which then causes a plant to be delayed - I'd be apt to go with a more expensive bidder. Also the expensive bidder may also have a more accurate quote due to greater technical experience. The low bidder may not have included all the testing in the original RFQ, or may not have known what testing was required.

Now, if everything is equal, then yea, go with the lowest bidder.
That's call loading fictitious variables to sustain an argument. Given those particulars, yes, a more expensive bidder could be warranted but normally RFPs or RFQs aren't accepted from substandard bidders. At least where I work we don't. We may put out an RFP and receive 30 subs, but reject 20 on face value for the things you point out. In the end, only 3-4 out of 8-10 are considered serious enough to move to the review phase. If you're RFP is detailed enough, the dreamers rarely submit.

Thats why Joe in Arizona does't get his garage plane under consideration with Lockheed or whoever.
 
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