2.3L vs 2.7L power curves / dyno chart comparisons

guzie

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You turned me off right there. I'm that guy who typically takes my vehicles past 200k miles. About to pass 200k on my Mustang with the V6, most I've done to it is a brake caliper and water pump (plus the axle back exhaust). I like it when I don't have to replace half an engine. So if the tune will hurt the vehicle in the long run, I'll stick with 310 hp and 400 lbs. torque.\

But thank you to those who answered.
Just a tune is not going to hurt the engine longevity if the tune is good, meaning it maintains proper fuel AFR and does not exceed safe boost levels. The factory tune is set to cover a wide range of fuels and conditions. They do not tune from the factory to the limits to allow plenty of safe margins to account for lesser grade fuel and conditions. A turbo engine can typically gain a decent amount of HP and torque with a good tune that adds some of what the factory left on the table. The typical route is to lock it into a 93 octane only tune if you have it available. Depending on your stock fuel system capacity you can even tune for E85 or a blend of say E30 or E50. The higher percentage of E85 the less efficient it is and it needs more volume of fuel. Typically the factory injectors and fuel pump isn’t set to handle full E85 fuel capacity needs to the cylinder. A rarity is a car with enough factory injector for it. My GT350 which was a NA car was one of those rarities that had enough factory fuel system capacity. I tuned it for E85 and just that fuel along with some long tube headers took the factory 526HP at the crank 460HP at the wheels to 520hp at the wheels. The E85 benefit is its 104 octane rating. You can crank up the timing advance without detonation. Cheap race fuel. It just loses 20% in efficiency so your fuel economy goes down. Plus side though is it’s typically 1.00 a gallon cheaper at the pump compared to 93. Turbo cars benefit more from the 104 octane vs a NA car. My Subaru WRX STI is tuned on 93 octane for example with just a bigger downpipe, catback exhaust and increase in boost to give me 60HP increase. Any tuning you do should be with a reputable pro tuner. They can do what is called an etune. They email you a tune which you load with a purchased tuning device like an access port or a Nguage. Then you do a datalog driving the vehicle and send the results to the tuner. The tuner will evaluate and adjust. The process will repeat until the tuner is satisfied with the results.





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DrewBronc21

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I’m still very undecided on the 2.3 or 2.7

I want the manual. It was my #1 requirement and I intend to modify either the 2.3 or the 2.7 but the potential of the bigger motor is hard to pass up.
 
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Personally going with JB4 for my 2.7L. Solid tuner with decades of experience and very clear powerband.
I don't have any experience with the JB4, but I will look into it. 100 ft-lbs @ 2500 rpm over a 97 tune seems like a lot. 5 Star is known to be one a little conservative. I'm intrigued. Thanks for posting.
 
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edgeflyer

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I honestly haven't done the deep comparison I thought I would at this point. I really would like the manual also, and am sure anyone who doesn't have a lead foot will be perfectly fine with the 2.3. Again, the 2.3 with a tune will run circles around a 1990's V8 even a 5.4 Ford, or 350 Chev. It is absolutely not the anemic 2.3 that used to barely get the ranger around town. That being said, I am going to look through some 5.0 Coyote vs 2.3 charts to make my final decision and will post my decision. Full disclosure, I have a speed problem.
 

DrewBronc21

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Just a tune is not going to hurt the engine longevity if the tune is good, meaning it maintains proper fuel AFR and does not exceed safe boost levels. The factory tune is set to cover a wide range of fuels and conditions. They do not tune from the factory to the limits to allow plenty of safe margins to account for lesser grade fuel and conditions. A turbo engine can typically gain a decent amount of HP and torque with a good tune that adds some of what the factory left on the table. The typical route is to lock it into a 93 octane only tune if you have it available. Depending on your stock fuel system capacity you can even tune for E85 or a blend of say E30 or E50. The higher percentage of E85 the less efficient it is and it needs more volume of fuel. Typically the factory injectors and fuel pump isn’t set to handle full E85 fuel capacity needs to the cylinder. A rarity is a car with enough factory injector for it. My GT350 which was a NA car was one of those rarities that had enough factory fuel system capacity. I tuned it for E85 and just that fuel along with some long tube headers took the factory 526HP at the crank 460HP at the wheels to 520hp at the wheels. The E85 benefit is its 104 octane rating. You can crank up the timing advance without detonation. Cheap race fuel. It just loses 20% in efficiency so your fuel economy goes down. Plus side though is it’s typically 1.00 a gallon cheaper at the pump compared to 93. Turbo cars benefit more from the 104 octane vs a NA car. My Subaru WRX STI is tuned on 93 octane for example with just a bigger downpipe, catback exhaust and increase in boost to give me 60HP increase. Any tuning you do should be with a reputable pro tuner. They can do what is called an etune. They email you a tune which you load with a purchased tuning device like an access port or a Nguage. Then you do a datalog driving the vehicle and send the results to the tuner. The tuner will evaluate and adjust. The process will repeat until the tuner is satisfied with the results.
Good info here. I have a FBO flexfuel 2011 STi. Been running E85 for 8 years or so and probably 160K trouble free miles between my 07 and my 11......It’s all in the tune.

The Bronco will be an all new learning curve and alot of unknowns but at least there are already experienced Tuners for the 2.3 and 2.7 EBs. E30 seems like a pain to mix, although before flexfuel kits came out, I used to test E85 with a test tube at the gas station before filling up my car because it had to run E85 or 93. There was no flex lol.

I will probably end up with the 2.3 Manual and look for a good Ecoboost tuner in NY area.
 

BroncoMan13

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For me the 2.3 stock has more power then most older v8s and gets better gas mileage. Also Ford will be offering Factory tuners for the 2.3 just like they do with the Mustang. You will get more then enough power and be covered under warranty.
 

fossil

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Not exactly on subject but my experience with 5Star. With 5Star you get dual tunes, engine/auto transmission.

I got a 5Star tuner for my E450 motor home 8 years back because the factory shift program was driving me nuts. A common issue I found out. In my case my motor home was much lighter than the E450 was rated/programed for but the Ford computer had no way of knowing that. The tune cured my issues. I stayed conservative on the engine side but noticed an improvement with the NA V10 in responsiveness/mileage anyway. If I have issues flat towing my Bronco I'm sure 5Star can tune for that also.
You buy the tuner, fill out a form describing what you want, they send you the tune, you load the tuner then the truck, good to go. Any issues, they work adjusting the tune with you.
Since I already had the tuner, I then bought another tune for the Raptor and happy with that as well.
Now hoping the same tuner is compatible with the much newer Bronco.
 

Shirt8u1

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You turned me off right there. I'm that guy who typically takes my vehicles past 200k miles. About to pass 200k on my Mustang with the V6, most I've done to it is a brake caliper and water pump (plus the axle back exhaust). I like it when I don't have to replace half an engine. So if the tune will hurt the vehicle in the long run, I'll stick with 310 hp and 400 lbs. torque.\

But thank you to those who answered.
The tune wont hurt the vehicle,
What hurts it is you keeping your Foot in it..
I got a 2014 F-250 with 275,000 miles on it,
tuned it at 60,000, no problems at all.
But I dont abuse it.
It has well over 500 HP.
I also know guys with tunes and blow them up..
Its all about the Driver.
Good Luck with your new Bronco.
Hope you enjoy it.
Bronco.jpg
 

EvlNvrDys

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The tune wont hurt the vehicle,
What hurts it is you keeping your Foot in it..
I got a 2014 F-250 with 275,000 miles on it,
tuned it at 60,000, no problems at all.
But I dont abuse it.
It has well over 500 HP.
I also know guys with tunes and blow them up..
Its all about the Driver.
Good Luck with your new Bronco.
Hope you enjoy it.
Bronco.jpg
Damn now you really turned me off the tune. My little V6 Mustang always has my foot into it. I make great use out of that 305 hp. Will probably do the same to my Bronco. So best if I stay stock.
 

Shirt8u1

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Damn now you really turned me off the tune. My little V6 Mustang always has my foot into it. I make great use out of that 305 hp. Will probably do the same to my Bronco. So best if I stay stock.
LOL
You get you foot in it..
Just got to know how much and when to get out of it,
when you are pushing it to the max...
You will love a tune.
Dont be scared of them.
Just use common sense.
Have fun Buddy!
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RockEye

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You turned me off right there. I'm that guy who typically takes my vehicles past 200k miles. About to pass 200k on my Mustang with the V6, most I've done to it is a brake caliper and water pump (plus the axle back exhaust). I like it when I don't have to replace half an engine. So if the tune will hurt the vehicle in the long run, I'll stick with 310 hp and 400 lbs. torque.\

But thank you to those who answered.
In the case of Subaru, an aftermarket pro tune is actually safer than the factory tune while producing considerable benefits.
 

DrewBronc21

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Just found that the Ford Performance tune for the Ranger limits tire size so probably won’t be able to do it on a Squatch Bronco and maybe they won’t even offer it at all? Probably not for manual either, at least not with warranty

A1026477-B061-44BE-A4B3-4D2903318D52.png
 

SwankyTiger

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Just found that the Ford Performance tune for the Ranger limits tire size so probably won’t be able to do it on a Squatch Bronco and maybe they won’t even offer it at all? Probably not for manual either, at least not with warranty

A1026477-B061-44BE-A4B3-4D2903318D52.png
it means they will only do it on a vehicle with that tire size, if it needs warranty work swap the smaller tires on.
 
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edgeflyer

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They can modify the tune for tire size, but I will tell you that the Ford tune will be much more conservative than the aftermarket at a higher price. With aftermarket, you can also call back and have things changed like throttle sensitivity or shift pressures, or purchase more tunes. You will also own the tuning box and can make some changes yourself.
 

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How much noticeable power and speed is obtained from getting a tune on a 2.7

When I went from a Honda Civic 4 to a 4 turbo it was a big difference. will the 6 tuned be an even bigger beast?

Would it be like that? I'm just trying to get a baseline on what to expect
 

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