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Black Diamond
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I respect your opinion. I do love the outdoors, and I strongly adhere to leave no trace principles. While not an excuse to purposely destroy the land, it should be understood that Johnson Valley OHV Area is not exactly an untouched pristine wilderness. It's an open vehicle area containing dozens of mines and prospects, and criss-crossed with thousands of roads, trails, and tracks.

While I generally agree with your perspective in most cases, and I'd hate to see mounds of rocks or other markers dotting the landscape every hundred yards, there are some important locations and routes that deserve a memorial or waymarker. Already there are man-made survey monuments (usually either chiseled stone or capped metal pipe, often with rock mounds next to them) every half-mile on a 1 mile by 1 mile grid covering the vast majority of the Western US that define land ownership of private lands and the management agency boundaries of public lands, including throughout Johnson Valley. The only exceptions I know of are Spanish Land Grants that pre-existed the Public Lands Survey System, some wilderness areas, and some tribal lands (and some as-yet unsurveyed land in Alaska). Many of the monuments date back to the late 1800s. If you look around, you may see some of them there. The USGS Topo Maps show those 1 mile by 1 mile squares (known as sections), usually as red lines, and the sidelines of each one of those squares is (or at one time was) marked on the ground at the corners and midpoints (hint: if you see a '+' mark on the map, the monument was recovered by USGS surveyors in the course of their cadastral work). Where public and or private ownership boundaries follow divisions of those sections into 1/4 sections, or 1/16 sections (what your grandfather might have called the "back forty"), or even smaller divisions, there is usually a marker. There is probably a survey monument at the corners of the land your home sits on. Other monuments not on the grid lines have been installed at various locations for other uses as well, such as mining claims, benchmarks, triangulation stations (those are shown on the USGS maps as triangles), reference monuments, witness monuments, bearing trees (those are really cool to find) and a host of others. In fact there is a triangulation station about a mile and a half Northwest of Bronco Knoll that I intend to search for next time I'm out there.

If the Bureau of Land Management objects to this cairn, then I will remove it. Otherwise, I believe this spot is of significant importance to the off-roading community and merits a respectful monument. I believe this cairn to be an appropriate way to preserve Bronco history and create a challenging and rewarding destination for off-road enthusiasts.

(Also, I just happen to earn a living by marking my and your territory.)

As a side note, Johnson Valley is negatively impacted by litter. I hauled away a garbage bag full of trash that I picked up around my campsite, and I challenge every other member of this forum to do the same whenever they get a chance to enjoy our public lands.
I appreciate the reply. I don't know the area, so will trust what you say it is. In the end, you're free to do whatever you want. I'm just hoping that maybe I, at the very least, brought some attention to the leave no trace. And maybe some people will read this and think twice the next time they're out in the wild about leaving their mark.





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Torgsurv

Torgsurv

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  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #47
State Plane scaled to ground please, US FT, :) JK
There's a fellow surveyor. I know you were kidding, but I can't resist:

SPC Zone CA 5 (0405)
Meters:
N: 614,537.653​
E: 2,114,124.206​
US Survey Feet:
N: 2,016,195.616​
E: 6,936,089.166​
International Feet:
N: 2,016,199.648​
E: 6,936,103.038​

I need a second point before I can scale a measurement between them to ground distance.
I'll refrain from adding the convergence angle, combined scale factor, and velocity. :LOL:
 

srick76

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This is a featured trail write-up that I hope will be of interest to all Bronco enthusiasts, especially those who own/will own a 6G.

I recently saw a photo taken by a fellow Bronco enthusiast who goes by Utah.Bronco on Instagram, which showed latitude and longitude coordinates (easter egg) hidden on the new 2021 Ford Bronco.

Bronco Easter Egg Coordinates Bronco Knoll.jpg



I was extremely curious about where the coordinates were pointing, and was delighted to discover that the secret location was in Johnson Valley OHV Area, just a few hours from where I live. I had never been to JV before, but always wanted to go, so I began researching the area and planning a trip. I couldn't think of a more fitting day to visit the spot than New Years Day 2021, to celebrate the first day of the year of the new Bronco!

The coordinates are on the top of a small hill in the Northwestern part of the OHV area, about 5 miles East by Northeast of Cougar Buttes, just West of Anderson Dry Lake, and about 500 feet above the surrounding valley. I used Google Earth to scout out the three routes that I considered to be the most likely to allow me to get up the hill in my completely stock 1991 Bronco XLT.

Bronco Knoll 001.jpg


I first attempted the Southern route, but the steep 35%+ hill climb with loose rocks and gravel proved to be too steep. (I may try it again next time with lower pressure in the tires.) Since I couldn't make it that way, I drove to around to the South end of Anderson Dry Lake and ascended the hill on the slightly less steep route up the East side of the hill. Here I encountered a couple of rocky ledges and took a little minor damage to a tube step, but was able to make it.

20210105_165728.jpg


At the top, the trail turns to the West and follows the ridge to a somewhat prominent peak, with a relatively wide flat spot. At this point, I turned on the GPS (Locus app on my phone) and walked the last few feet to the precise location.

Screenshot_20210101-104100_Locus Map.jpg


I half expected to find a plaque or memorial left there by the Ford Bronco testing team (T-shirts on the Ford Bronco amazon store tout Johnson Valley as "The Original Proving Ground", and many of the reveal photos and videos were shot there). Instead, I found nothing but rocks and great views. Being a land surveyor by profession, and having a penchant for monuments marking unique and special locations, I naturally raised a small cairn to mark the spot and named it Bronco Knoll.

20210101_104938.jpg


On the descent, I attempted the third route, but was soon blocked by a very narrow rocky pass on a sidehill trail that I didn't dare attempt without supporting vehicles, and was forced to go back the way I had come. Maybe another day.

I'll be back in Johnson Valley again later this month and/or early next month for King of the Hammers, and will gladly lead a group of other adventurous souls to the site. I hope many Bronco owners will visit Bronco Knoll in the future and add a stone to the pile!

20210101_105604.jpg


(Send me a PM if you'd like to have a kml file of the routes.)
[Edited for typos]
Awesome man, thank you for the narrative. I’m on the east coast but am seriously taking a vacation out there just for this and the wheel some the areas I’ve only seen on YouTube.
 

BadlandsBroncoBen

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This is a featured trail write-up that I hope will be of interest to all Bronco enthusiasts, especially those who own/will own a 6G.

I recently saw a photo taken by a fellow Bronco enthusiast who goes by Utah.Bronco on Instagram, which showed latitude and longitude coordinates (easter egg) hidden on the new 2021 Ford Bronco.

Bronco Easter Egg Coordinates Bronco Knoll.jpg



I was extremely curious about where the coordinates were pointing, and was delighted to discover that the secret location was in Johnson Valley OHV Area, just a few hours from where I live. I had never been to JV before, but always wanted to go, so I began researching the area and planning a trip. I couldn't think of a more fitting day to visit the spot than New Years Day 2021, to celebrate the first day of the year of the new Bronco!

The coordinates are on the top of a small hill in the Northwestern part of the OHV area, about 5 miles East by Northeast of Cougar Buttes, just West of Anderson Dry Lake, and about 500 feet above the surrounding valley. I used Google Earth to scout out the three routes that I considered to be the most likely to allow me to get up the hill in my completely stock 1991 Bronco XLT.

Bronco Knoll 001.jpg


I first attempted the Southern route, but the steep 35%+ hill climb with loose rocks and gravel proved to be too steep. (I may try it again next time with lower pressure in the tires.) Since I couldn't make it that way, I drove to around to the South end of Anderson Dry Lake and ascended the hill on the slightly less steep route up the East side of the hill. Here I encountered a couple of rocky ledges and took a little minor damage to a tube step, but was able to make it.

20210105_165728.jpg


At the top, the trail turns to the West and follows the ridge to a somewhat prominent peak, with a relatively wide flat spot. At this point, I turned on the GPS (Locus app on my phone) and walked the last few feet to the precise location.

Screenshot_20210101-104100_Locus Map.jpg


I half expected to find a plaque or memorial left there by the Ford Bronco testing team (T-shirts on the Ford Bronco amazon store tout Johnson Valley as "The Original Proving Ground", and many of the reveal photos and videos were shot there). Instead, I found nothing but rocks and great views. Being a land surveyor by profession, and having a penchant for monuments marking unique and special locations, I naturally raised a small cairn to mark the spot and named it Bronco Knoll.

20210101_104938.jpg


On the descent, I attempted the third route, but was soon blocked by a very narrow rocky pass on a sidehill trail that I didn't dare attempt without supporting vehicles, and was forced to go back the way I had come. Maybe another day.

I'll be back in Johnson Valley again later this month and/or early next month for King of the Hammers, and will gladly lead a group of other adventurous souls to the site. I hope many Bronco owners will visit Bronco Knoll in the future and add a stone to the pile!

20210101_105604.jpg


(Send me a PM if you'd like to have a kml file of the routes.)
[Edited for typos]
Awesome! thank you for sharing!
 

srick76

Black Diamond
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Those battle scars are kickass and a nice souvenir from your visit. This is precisely how automobiles become a part of us, like a friend or family member. They’re often with us on our most memorable adventures, sharing experiences with us, and sometimes the sole reason we’re able to have any kind of unique experience at all (in the case of more specialized vehicles). I find that I develop a much deeper connection to a car after a long road trip, especially if it didn’t leave me stranded or otherwise cause some huge inconvenience.

This may be my favorite post on 6g since joining. Well done, sir!
agreed 100% this post made my F'ing day!
 

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