Dragging rear wheel while turning

Merc4x4

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But you have a Badlands so you have the Advanced 4x4 system with 4A, Sport defaults to 4A but with your system that is fine, because 4A is most of the time 2H and only 4H if the system feels you are losing traction.
You don’t need to do the 2 step process, and honestly I don’t think anybody needs to, maybe Ford will come with a software update to default slippery to 2H for non advance 4x4 systems or set the record straight and let us know if 4H is good for rain.
Yes, I was commiserating with the 2-step process, but @Vigor is saying Slippery 2H is not possible anyway.


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Merc4x4

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The point at which the communication is breaking down is on the definition of 'slippery'.

The Ford manual considers 'slippery' under the G.O.A.T. mode of the same name to be on pavement

to be used '...for crossing terrain where a firm surface is covered with loose or slippery material, such as snow and ice.'

To me it seems clear they are talking about a very low friction surface that you won't sink in. (not mud ) like gravel, snow, and ice. Something the vehicle rides upon above the firm surface, rain does not qualify to my mind as it is displaced by the tires under the vehicle weight and you don't ride upon it (unless hydroplaning and at that point it doesn't matter how many wheels are powered, you are done.)

I suspect that is Ford's take on it as well from the way it is written and their knowledge base that makes some subconscious assumptions about the understanding of a laymen.

The use of the 'less than ideal road conditions' is poorly written and we can all see how that could confuse the meaning of the '...for crossing terrain..." section for someone without a moderate understanding of how 4WD differs from AWD (and the manufacturers love to use those interchangeably, I am well-versed in the differences and I often have to dig deep in research to try to figure out what system a vehicle actually possess, they don't make it easy)

Ford assumed folks understood because they understand rain is not slippery per their internal 4WD definition. Folks don't understand because, well...rain can be slippery by the dictionary definition.

Point of view/perspective is responsible for most all disagreements on anything. I have found that if you can figure out the one point where there is a disconnect in communication (and it is usually a single word or short phrase that two parties disagree on the meaning because it is truly arbitrary or subjective (aka not a noun)) and clarify it, most folks agree on just about everything. They just aren't speaking the same language until that point.
The icon also looks like it has rain drops.
I'm guessing here, but if Ford has a slippery mode in any of their other SUV's, it's OK to use in the rain on pavement.
I believe these icons reflect what is displayed in the Bronco. Slippery looks like rain, snow, sand/mud.

*I don't know who made this chart, so disregard the Pavement/Off-Road categories.
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Merc4x4

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There are such a wide variety of people using this site there is no clear-cut answer for when slippery should be used. Can you use it in the rain? Sure, but what is "in the rain" to you? In the rain, we also have to be concerned with hydroplaning. That's when water gets under the tread of your tires causing our vehicle to lose traction and control. Hydroplaning risk is based on the amount of standing water (rainfall rate vs draining) and vehicle speed and 4WD does absolutely nothing to protect us from that. (Tire siping reduces the surface area for water to get under the tread, improving traction in a number of situations)

People get a 4WD system and think they are suddenly bulletproof. But what a 4WD system does is makes it easier to go the direction you want to.
What it doesn't do is:

Decrease your braking distance, in fact, it often increases it.
Protect you from ice on the roadway
Protect you from hydroplaning on the roadway.

4WD will improve vehicle stability in slippery conditions, but it doesn't solve for everything.
Yes, which is why manufacturers are providing throttle, transmission, steering, traction control and stability control tuning for different situations and packaging them in 'drive modes'.
 

blsbikes2

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Because I am an IDIOT
I Just realized what binding is
Somewhere I read 4H could be used for slippery situations and it was raining really hard. Anyways everyday you learn something new
Thanks
Usually it is the front end that has the issue. AWD and 4WD are two different animals. AWD can be on all the time and you would rarely notice it. 4WD on a dry (or mostly dry) road will noticebly bind up when trying to turn. On a truck with part time 4WD the issue is very noticable, but at the front end only in my experience. The only time I ever use 4 high in the rain is if the road is flooded and/or has large puddles on it. Even then it is only for very brief moments and never when turning. Dragging a rear wheen does not make sense to me unless some kind of electric posi-traction is at work or the lockers are engaged.
 

Merc4x4

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do you have 4A and slippery mode selects 4A??
Because I do not have 4A and slippery mode selects 4H and I was able to select 2H after selecting slippery and no warning whatsoever (I didn’t drive it though just tested it while parked)
I read this again and see you are able to select 2H in Slippery mode.
Another option would be to use Eco mode. It relaxes the throttle, steering, and smooths the shifts to help you avoid abrupt inputs that can traction loss and resulting skid. I don't know if it changes the traction/stability control operation over Normal mode.
 

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JerryC

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The big difference between your truck and the bronco is weight distribution. A pickup truck is always low on weight on the rear unless you add something to deal with it. Thus the traction available for the rear is always much less than the front. You also didn't mention if your truck has a part-time 4wd system or a full-time 4wd system. My 98 Durango had a separate transfer case lever that gave me Full-Time 4wd High, Part-Time 4wd High, and Part-Time 4wd Low.

Speed plays a large role in the possible damage. For the Jeep, the explosion came on a long sweeping exit ramp from a highway. The driver was going 55mph around the corner in 4High, and there was no time for a wheel to slip; it just popped the case open, scattering gears all over the place.
It was a part time system
 

AK SNO RIDER

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Hey all I was actually considering about posting something similar, we had a light coating of snow and I switched my 4dr OBX to Slippery GOAT. When the wheel was completely cut either backing out of a spot or pulling in, it felt "jerky". Following the thread but this may be something others can test, I'm going to let me dealer know.
Boy four wheel drive really is new to a lot of people here.

That is how it works. Even in snow you are going to feel some binding when you are at full steering lock. You're trying to turn all 4 wheels at different speeds.

Do not go to the dealer.
 

Southern Girl

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sounds like you destroyed your bronco using 4 high on pavement
I doubt it.

I've driven a mile or so in the rain on 35's with no issue in a Ram truck will in 4wd.
Most people with 4x4 trucks who live in the country and need 4H on occasion may inadvertently drive a few miles on pavement with the 4H engaged. A lot of people are getting very upset with the OP, but I am of the opinion that they probably drive a Honda Civic and should hush.
 
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Boy four wheel drive really is new to a lot of people here.

That is how it works. Even in snow you are going to feel some binding when you are at full steering lock. You're trying to turn all 4 wheels at different speeds.

Do not go to the dealer.
Yes I agree, But even for new 4x4 owners here you can REALLY tell binding doesn’t feel right at all, and you will not drive it a lot this way.
I really think the confusion is what slippery really means, by definition heavy rain is slippery and, there’s no a single warning when engaging 4H about max speed or on wet road use, and even the manual wording is pretty vague, it specifically states “do not on dry pavement”
I am SURE tons of people have used slippery modes in Ford trucks while raining at high speeds and coming in and out of the freeway while taking on-ramps or cloverleafs, and nothing happened, if these systems were so fragile there would be a warning when you select it “Slippery mode/4H is not intended to use on wet pavement or above 50mph” or something to that effect.
 

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Yes I agree, But even for new 4x4 owners here you can REALLY tell binding doesn’t feel right at all, and you will not drive it a lot this way.
I really think the confusion is what slippery really means, by definition heavy rain is slippery and, there’s no a single warning when engaging 4H about max speed or on wet road use, and even the manual wording is pretty vague, it specifically states “do not on dry pavement”
I am SURE tons of people have used slippery modes in Ford trucks while raining at high speeds and coming in and out of the freeway while taking on-ramps or cloverleafs, and nothing happened, if these systems were so fragile there would be a warning when you select it “Slippery mode/4H is not intended to use on wet pavement or above 50mph” or something to that effect.
I'm pretty sure mine slips into 4A when I use that mode. I guess you don't have 4A, though. I think sand mode and mud mode both use 4H, though.
 

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BostonGuy

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Boy four wheel drive really is new to a lot of people here.

That is how it works. Even in snow you are going to feel some binding when you are at full steering lock. You're trying to turn all 4 wheels at different speeds.

Do not go to the dealer.
100% haven't had anything other than a Jetta in the last almost 20 years. I appreciate the insight though. Thank you! There's is a lot have gave no clue on regarding this car other than looking forward to learning and loving driving it.
 
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feralc

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I doubt it.



Most people with 4x4 trucks who live in the country and need 4H on occasion may inadvertently drive a few miles on pavement with the 4H engaged. A lot of people are getting very upset with the OP, but I am of the opinion that they probably drive a Honda Civic and should hush.
Haha thanks for defending me, I didn’t take those messages in a bad way, I am 100% sure my truck is fine, and yes I am sure a lot of people drive in 4H inadvertently just to find out later when they are trying to park or so.
I think the thread became productive because we discussed slippery mode and when you should use it, I believe the majority would think slippery mode is for rain use too, because a wet road is slippery by definition, personally after reading all the inputs and reading the manual I believe it is not particularly intended for rain, but ice/snow, but I do not believe it would create damage if you do use it in rain, imagine all the lawsuits against Ford for all the destroyed drivetrains by using slippery mode and Ford claiming wet pavement is not “slippery enough” especially with off road tires.
I am new to 4x4 and I am loving my Bronco so any input is appreciated. Happy new year everybody
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