rtaylor

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Thank you for this post! As a noob there is a lot of great advice, maybe some more advice on builds?
You could try renting a jeep to see what you like. For example, you can rent a slightly modified jeep in Moab for less than $300/day and try the moderate trails like Fins&Things, Hell Revenge, and Poison Spider. They won't let you go on trails with high risk of damage, but you can go anywhere that most people would be willing to take a new daily driver Bronco.


EDIT: here's another question I asked on another thread that never got answered - if I end up going BD non Sas is it possible or make sense that a ratchet style locker could be added to the front if I ever get to the point I think they are needed? or does having rear electronic lockers make that not even an option in the future?
Mechanical locker (detroit locker) is not typically suitable for front axle. Mechanical locker is suitable for rear, if willing to accept bad effects (care when turning on slick surfaces).
Part-time locker or limited slip is suitable for front. Bias-geared limited slip works well in the front, but not as well as locker for rock crawl. Electric rear locker has no impact on what you can do in the front.
 

AZshot

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I've been through knee deep, 40 yard stretches of western rivers in my 2WD Ford F-150 with 16" wheels and small tires. And up and down some pretty serious mine roads in AZ and NM in the 240,000 miles since I had it. Before it, I had a great Toyota 4runner, similar miles put on, somewhat rougher roads. When I bought the truck, it was for towing mostly, and I wondered how bad a mistake not having 4WD would be. Turns out, after 18 years, not so much. Before the F-150, a Mazda B2000 that I took down into Mexico into Copper Canyon several times. Before that, a BMW R80 I rode down through mexico for 6 weeks. I guess I have over a million miles of offroad experience in my life.

I'm SURE going back to 4WD with a Bronco will get me right back to what I did in the 4runner - elk hunting in snowy forest service roads, old mine roads, arrowhead hunting forbidden zones, and such. I'm not sweating the tire sizes. At ALL. Especially after watching that "The Road Chose ME" videos, where he says he saw almost no one in Africa or S. America with giant tires, and gave reasons why they are less than ideal. Don't even need the skid plates or front locking wheels so am going for a Big Bend manual. I don't do rock crawling or other feats of manhood. But I do go out into the wilderness or off road hundreds of times a year, and have for 30 years. Tire size? Don't sweat it if you're not doing 4WD competition level stuff.
 

MattECDNdealer

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STOP RIGHT THERE MISTER!

Not even sure where to begin.
1. Mearsuring tires while on the vehicle and saying they are "XX" inches is going to be wildly inaccurate when compared to the given specs of any tire.


2. When you hear 35" or 33" tires, it is USUALLY a generalization. Many tires do NOT measure out to those numbers....they are USUALLY smaller.
Good summary. As an example, the 37" Super Swamper SXIIs I have on my Jeep TJ measure almost exactly 35" tall when on the vehicle. This tire line is known to run quite small VS. the size on the sidewall, so I knew I was getting roughly a "true" 35" tall tire.
 

King_Bronco0327

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After 6 months on this forum I can see that there are lots of potentially new off-road enthusiasts looking to get into Broncos! This is exciting and it’ll be great to see the 4x4 community grow in general.

I also see lots of “what’s this do”, “do I need this or that” type questions, so I thought I would lend my 2 cents on my general philosophy after having been heavy into off-roading the last ~15 years or so. With my below suggestions, I will assume that you may someday want to do some serious trails - not just gravel roads and an occasional mud rut.
  1. Get a good driveline. The number one thing I want to tell you is that I believe it as FAR more advantageous to pony up as much money as possible to purchase the stoutest factory driveline that you can get in your rig - if you even remotely think you may wheel aggressively. I’m talking about making sure you spend your money on things that AREN’T easy to change or add on in the aftermarket / used market world.
    • The prime example of this would be axles. If you think you will someday want to run 35”+ tires, do everything within your power to get the M210 axles. An example of this in the Jeep world would be the Dana 35 axles - which are a serious drawback when one wants to get serious about wheeling. Especially with lockers.
  2. Which brings me to my next point - lockers! The #1 single biggest improvement I made to my ‘79 Bronco was adding a rear Detroit-style locker. It’s simply AMAZING what happens when you get all tires turning in all conditions. Therefore - I HIGHLY recommend putting down the cash for lockers. Lockers are both difficult and expensive to add aftermarket. Adding a front locker also takes you to a whole other level.
  3. Transfer Case. Swapping or modifying transfer cases is VERY difficult post-purchase. Therefore - get the best transfer case you can afford. Specifically, lowest available gearing is what you are after. Secondary transfer case features like automatic engagement are also highly valuable, but may not be justified as needed on it's own (if it were separate from the gearing).
  4. Sway-bar disconnect. You NEED a sway-bar disconnect. You do NOT need the fancy-pants electronic disconnect Bronco offers as there will be aftermarket versions available cheap, but you cannot underestimate the value of this extra articulation. Adding an aftermarket version will likely be a nice intro to DIY vehicle modifications. Disconnects I think will be even more important with the Bronco due to the already lesser articulation compared to a solid front axle.
  5. MINIMIZE any lift that you add. It’s amazing how much fun you can have on a small lift and 35” tires. You likely do not need >2in of lift in this Bronco to keep you happy and entertained for a LONG time. Honestly, I would recommend stock Badlands height and no lift for as long as possible. The primary reason for this is keeping your center of gravity as low as possible. High CGs equate to bad off-road handling. Good driving skills overcome lack of lift in many situations.
  6. You do NOT NEED BEADLOCKS! I regularly run 12psi in the rear, and 15psi in the front. This is plenty low to get adequate deformation of the tire (see above picture). I have only had 1 problem with unseating a bead, which was due to winch operator error (I winched myself sideways when it wasn't necessary). Until you're doing expert level stuff, save your money for those lockers ;)
In summary - I’m part of a Jeep Club and I CONSTANTLY see people buying expensive D44 crate axles, paying for lockers with install labor, etc., and generally speaking they always wish they would have just bought a Rubicon to begin with. It can eliminate a lot of headache if you’re think you might get serious. Starting with the best available hardware to begin with has a lot of advantages.

Important Contributions From Other Members (Paraphrased)
  1. Trail Etiquette @Ramble_Offroad
    1. Never go wheeling alone
    2. Stay on designated routes
    3. Always pick up your trash
    4. Tread lightly
    5. Don't be an asshole
    6. Pay it forward
    7. Leave it better than you found it
    8. https://staythetrail.org/
  2. Wheeling Advice @Ramble_Offroad @Bronco @WillisC’onnors @BLTN @broncoenthusiast @BAUS67 @395N @pan-y-cerveza @RevealItAsap
    1. Understand and stay within the limits of your equipment and skillset
      • Be realistic
      • Don't let anyone (especially cute girls/guys) talk you into exceeding your limits
    2. Carefully select your line and read the terrain. Walk the critical sections first. Walking the next obstacle section of the trail is a VERY helpful.
    3. Too much throttle + hopping = broken shit
    4. Join a local club. They will have access to private wheeling ground you won't. Also a great deal of experienced people.
    5. Anticipate the effects of poor weather. A moderate trail can become nearly impassable after just a few minutes of rain/snow
    6. Don't be afraid to use it. Part of wheeling is occasional damage. Obviously don't trash your rig, but using your common sense know that damage can be fixed.
    7. Traction is everything. Minimize wheel spin wherever possible. Tire placement on obstacles is very important.
  3. Gear advice @Ramble_Offroad @Gr8Hortoni @Blksn955.o
    • You NEED a first aid kit. It can be simple.
    • Tire puncture repair kit & air compressor = gold
      • Great way to pick up 4x4 chicks err I mean friends
    • LOCKERS BEFORE LIGHTBARS!!!
      • When the rubber meats the road, ONLY functionality matters.
    • A blanket - girls love them and so do you
    • Roll of toilet paper. Definitely necessary - keep a full roll in a plastic bag. Leaves or a sacrificial sock are your alternative...
MIOBI (Make It Or Break It) - Knoxville, IA (private owned park)
IMG_4197.JPG


Strike Ravine - Moab, UT
StrikeRavine3.jpg


Iron Range - Gilbert, MN (Public DNR run park)
DSCN1073.JPG
How do I get all this on the bLack Diamond?
 

Mattwings

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How do I get all this on the bLack Diamond?
ADD SQ if you want it all :) I think a lot of us are on the fence between BD and BL. In my opinion, the BD with the Advanced Transfer case is really a nice starting point for the majority of people who want to do basic off roading with good all around capability. The SQ option adds the front locker, larger tires, lift and heavier front axle, along with "35s" (which for me, it too big, too wide). The middle ground there is a BL with "33s". There you get the beefier axle, smaller lift and sway bar disconnect, which will probably be available aftermarket in a more basic former, fairly quickly.
 

King_Bronco0327

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ADD SQ if you want it all :) I think a lot of us are on the fence between BD and BL. In my opinion, the BD with the Advanced Transfer case is really a nice starting point for the majority of people who want to do basic off roading with good all around capability. The SQ option adds the front locker, larger tires, lift and heavier front axle, along with "35s" (which for me, it too big, too wide). The middle ground there is a BL with "33s". There you get the beefier axle, smaller lift and sway bar disconnect, which will probably be available aftermarket in a more basic former, fairly quickly.
Does the advance transfer case on the BD only come with the Sasquatch Package? Or is it standard? I also saw a spec pdf recently here on B6G that had details on each trim. Can’t seem to find it. (But It’s not the one you can get off the Ford website)
 

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