Is this partly why the Manual is not available for the 2.7L Engine?

TXRancher

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I just finished watching the video below. The video explains how an electronic throttle-body leads to rev hang with a manual transmission. In short, to prevent additional emissions of either CO and HydroCarbons (Rich fuel/air mixture) or NOx (Lean fuel/air mixture), the closing of the throttle-body is delayed to allow excess fuel coating the header to be burnt efficiently and opening of the throttle-body is delayed to allow fuel to be mixed properly.

Since the 2.3L as direct injection, there is no fuel coating the intake reducing the time needed to clear the excess fuel when the throttle-body closes shorting the rev hang.

In short, are emissions are a part of the reason preventing the manual transmission being used with the 2.7L Port and direct injection?


Now I drove a Scion FR-S with a 6 speed MT and the Toyota DS-4 Fuel system with direct and port injection and I don't recall any issues with rev-hang on that car.





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Straight 6

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The main reason is that nobody would actually buy it

It costs money to certify a trans/engine combo and it's not cheap.

People on forums love to whine about manual transmission dying, but not enough of them open their wallets and buy new vehicles.

I've only owned manual vehicles but man, it's over. Automatics are good now. Unless I'm at the Porsche store I'll take the slushbox next time
 

Imissmy1996bronco

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That might be a factor, but the bigger thing is that the 2.7 has never been offered with a manual, and there are design and machining changes that need to be made to make an engine designed exclusively for auto usage compatible with a manual.

Ford probably just doesn’t have enough of a business case to make the changes of adding another variant of the 2.7 engine to their production line. (For reference, the 2.3 has always been available with a manual or auto, so they don’t need to make any major changes to it)

Also, Ford has been going wild with dealer installed tunes that let you keep your warranty, and a tuned 2.7 would definitely exceed that manual transmissions rating.

Another reason is that the bellhousing is integrated into the transmission housing, so they would need another variant of the mti550, and there probably isn’t enough of a business case for that either.
 

harpo

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My Subaru is a manual, and does the rev hang. It is annoying but didn't stop them from offering the manual.
 

Dick_Castlesmurff

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The main reason is that nobody would actually buy it

It costs money to certify a trans/engine combo and it's not cheap.

People on forums love to whine about manual transmission dying, but not enough of them open their wallets and buy new vehicles.

I've only owned manual vehicles but man, it's over. Automatics are good now. Unless I'm at the Porsche store I'll take the slushbox next time
This doesn't explain why they chose to give the MT to the 2.3 and not the 2.7. I get the reason behind only pairing it with one engine, but 2.7 would have be the more popular pairing 2 to 1.
 

Imissmy1996bronco

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I don’t think that 3.3 is offered with a manual transmission anywhere either? So the only thing that would help would be the torque rating. It would actually have a worse business case than the 2.7, because for most buyers that 3.3 will be seen as a downgrade from the 2.3 that’s already available with a manual.
 

Rick Astley

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This doesn't explain why they chose to give the MT to the 2.3 and not the 2.7. I get the reason behind only pairing it with one engine, but 2.7 would have be the more popular pairing 2 to 1.
Torque and price. There's your short answer. It would be drastically more expensive (engineering and materials) to produce a transmission to handle the higher torque output yet have that numb modern feel of an auto.

To make a modern transmission as smooth and unobtrusive as they can, and avoid high wear components such as clutches that slip all day but don't burn out, the price goes up. If the clutch has ANY notchiness or rough engagement then people complain via keyboard and shit-can the "feel".

It's not as if they're going to go back and put a fluid-filled torque converter in there the way god intended in the 1960's.

Frankly, i'd pay an upcharge to have a proper manual on the 2.7, but i'm also happy to get a manual on the 2.3 without charge. That motor is stout and solid. Have driven about 3k miles with a 2019 Ranger and the only let-down on that truck is the 10-speed auto. But i'm not delusional to assume the manual paired with the 2.3 is going to be as smooth and sweet as the gearbox on a Honda S2000. Just hoping it's a bit more forgiving than the stage 3 transmission and clutch from the Evo 9 that I daily drove for a few years.
 

connorville

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The main reason is that nobody would actually buy it

It costs money to certify a trans/engine combo and it's not cheap.

People on forums love to whine about manual transmission dying, but not enough of them open their wallets and buy new vehicles.

I've only owned manual vehicles but man, it's over. Automatics are good now. Unless I'm at the Porsche store I'll take the slushbox next time

I'd put my money where my mouth is and buy a 2.7 manual
 

HeritageRider

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This doesn't explain why they chose to give the MT to the 2.3 and not the 2.7. I get the reason behind only pairing it with one engine, but 2.7 would have be the more popular pairing 2 to 1.
Not too long ago, someone did a poll asking which motor you would choose if both were offered with the manual. Almost 9 out of 10 said they would take the 2.7.
 

toystwo

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Have driven about 3k miles with a 2019 Ranger and the only let-down on that truck is the 10-speed auto.
What didn’t you like about the 10-speed?
 

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