Badplaid72

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There will be a maintenance schedule for on-road and off-road use cases. Fox actually specifies rebuild intervals for the stock shocks on the Raptor and other truck platforms. I would use their guidelines for the Bilsteins also.

https://www.ridefox.com/service.php?m=truck
Perfect! Thanks, looks like about 25 to 30k if off-roading a bit.





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Evolkidbell

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There will be a maintenance schedule for on-road and off-road use cases. Fox actually specifies rebuild intervals for the stock shocks on the Raptor and other truck platforms. I would use their guidelines for the Bilsteins also.

https://www.ridefox.com/service.php?m=truck
From what I've seen on cut-aways of the OEM Bilstein units, they do not look serviceable.
The end gland and reservoir end both look to be swaged on.
Also, no Fill/Schrader port on the Reservoir end.

That wouldn't stop people in the Know from opening them and converting them to serviceable though. We used to weld shader bungs onto 5100s as to open/re-valve/re-pressurize them.


HOSS-Detail.jpg
 

Philly

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This might be a dumb question, but I am not very familiar with coilovers.

I plan to level my suspension because I hate the way any rake looks on vehicles. Do I add spacers to adjust the spring perch like people do on the Raptor? Sorry if I’m using the wrong terms... like I said not super familiar with coilover setups.

Also, I am assuming leveling the Bronco this way will stiffen the front a bit, is that correct?

Is this the best way to level the suspension? I don’t see it necessary to replace the factory Bilsteins right away...
 

lsustang05

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From what I've seen on cut-aways of the OEM Bilstein units, they do not look serviceable.
The end gland and reservoir end both look to be swaged on.
Also, no Fill/Schrader port on the Reservoir end.

That wouldn't stop people in the Know from opening them and converting them to serviceable though. We used to weld shader bungs onto 5100s as to open/re-valve/re-pressurize them.


HOSS-Detail.jpg
Technically there isn’t a shrader on the Fox shocks for the Raptor, but it’s an easy add-on. The swaged on ends would definitely pose as a bigger hurdle to overcome, though.

Perfect! Thanks, looks like about 25 to 30k if off-roading a bit.
If you ever have browsed the Raptor forums or facebook pages, almost everybody recommends getting the stock shocks rebuilt at 20-30K miles, so I think you’re right on track with your thought process. Either rebuild, or upgrade, at 20-30K miles.
 

Evolkidbell

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Technically there isn’t a shrader on the Fox shocks for the Raptor, but it’s an easy add-on. The swaged on ends would definitely pose as a bigger hurdle to overcome, though.
Yes. The Fox Raptor shock have a needle fill port or pellet. Can be charged/discharged with a special tool. Looking closely at the the picture above and there is no port leading though the cap to the inside. That means they are most likely filled and assembled inside a chamber at 100-200 psi. Usually automated assembly as well. 5100s are built this way.
 

lsustang05

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Yes. The Fox Raptor shock have a needle fill port or pellet. Can be charged/discharged with a special tool. Looking closely at the the picture above and there is no port leading though the cap to the inside. That means they are most likely filled and assembled inside a chamber at 100-200 psi. Usually automated assembly as well. 5100s are built this way.
Drill your own hole and hope for the best?

disclaimer: don’t do this.
 

Hemisfear

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I don’t know what the marketing dept is calling high-clearance. They could be pointing out that anything with the upgraded Bilsteins has a lift compared to the stock suspension. They could be referencing the bump stops limiting up-travel.
BL, WT, FE, & Sasquatch have the same suspension setup except for the regular bump stops on the BL.
Taller and heavier springs gets the extra height!
 

kodiakisland

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It all depends on how the suspension is setup, which of course we have little info on.

You can use the same springs and shocks to get different amounts of lift and travel. Bilstein does this on shocks with different settings for the spring perch. Increase preload, increase lift, decrease travel.

Details like spring length and rate would be nice to know, but I imagine we won't know that until people actually get their Bronco and start taking it apart. Ford isn't giving up much info on the subject right now.
 

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Perfect! Thanks, looks like about 25 to 30k if off-roading a bit.
I asked Bilstein about rebuild intervals with the 8112s with light off roading and they said 60-80k miles, and specifically said, "they will last about as long as traditional shocks (between rebuilds)." These are not the same but I think it's safe to say these are designed and built to last about as long as any other shock, i.e. about 100k miles with no off roading, less depending on how hard you work them. There's no way they'll be dead at 30k miles unless you are beating the hell out of them.
 

Badplaid72

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I asked Bilstein about rebuild intervals with the 8112s with light off roading and they said 60-80k miles, and specifically said, "they will last about as long as traditional shocks (between rebuilds)." These are not the same but I think it's safe to say these are designed and built to last about as long as any other shock, i.e. about 100k miles with no off roading, less depending on how hard you work them. There's no way they'll be dead at 30k miles unless you are beating the hell out of them.
Thanks, great info. I’m eager to learn.
 

Austin26

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Perhaps someone can simplify this for me as I come from a car background and these are for off-roading as well.

What SHOULD the ride quality (highway and paved roads) be like on these versus the standard shocks?

Thank you.
 

BuckeyeinNV

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Perhaps someone can simplify this for me as I come from a car background and these are for off-roading as well.

What SHOULD the ride quality (highway and paved roads) be like on these versus the standard shocks?

Thank you.
They will probably be a touch stiffer to reduce body roll due to the added height, but it might not even be noticeable. Because they are position sensitive, they could valve them so the "middle" range - where the shock will operate in normal driving - will have similar compliance to any other body-on-frame SUV/truck, while still providing proper stiffness to prevent bottoming out during high inputs - i.e. off road.

Or course, everything is theoretical until we get some unbiased reviews and test drives.
 

Austin26

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They will probably be a touch stiffer to reduce body roll due to the added height, but it might not even be noticeable. Because they are position sensitive, they could valve them so the "middle" range - where the shock will operate in normal driving - will have similar compliance to any other body-on-frame SUV/truck, while still providing proper stiffness to prevent bottoming out during high inputs - i.e. off road.

Or course, everything is theoretical until we get some unbiased reviews and test drives.
Thank you! I appreciate that. I'm likely getting the base and obviously the Sasquatch would be nice though absolute overkill for me.
 

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